Effects of genetic selection and voluntary activity on the medial gastrocnemius muscle in house mice

Wen Zhi Zhan, John G. Swallow, Theodore Garland, David Nathan Proctor, Patrick A. Carter, Gary C. Sieck

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

32 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a previous study (J. G. Swallow, T. Garland, Jr., P. A. Carter, W.-Z. Zhan, and G. C. Sieck, J. Appl. Physiol. 84: 69-76, 1998), we found that in house mice both genetic selection (10 generations of artificial selection for high voluntary activity on running wheels) and access to running wheels (7-8 weeks) elicited a modest increase in maximal oxygen consumption. Based on these results, we hypothesized that genetic selection would affect the changes in endurance and oxidative capacity of the medial gastrocnemius (MG) muscle induced by wheel access (training response). Wheel access increased the isotonic endurance of the MG in both genetically selected and random-bred (control) mice. However, this exercise-induced improvement in isotonic endurance of the MG was similar between genetically selected and control mice. Wheel access also increased the succinate dehydrogenase activity of MG muscle fibers in both selected and control lines. However, this exercise- induced increase in succinate dehydrogenase activity was comparable between genetically selected and control animals. Taken together, these results indicate that the modest increase in maximal oxygen consumption associated with genetic selection is not reflected by the training-induced changes in oxidative capacity and endurance of MG muscle fibers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2326-2333
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume87
Issue number6
StatePublished - Dec 1999

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Genetic Selection
Skeletal Muscle
Succinate Dehydrogenase
Oxygen Consumption
Running
Swallows

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Endocrinology
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Zhan, W. Z., Swallow, J. G., Garland, T., Proctor, D. N., Carter, P. A., & Sieck, G. C. (1999). Effects of genetic selection and voluntary activity on the medial gastrocnemius muscle in house mice. Journal of Applied Physiology, 87(6), 2326-2333.
Zhan, Wen Zhi ; Swallow, John G. ; Garland, Theodore ; Proctor, David Nathan ; Carter, Patrick A. ; Sieck, Gary C. / Effects of genetic selection and voluntary activity on the medial gastrocnemius muscle in house mice. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 1999 ; Vol. 87, No. 6. pp. 2326-2333.
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Zhan, WZ, Swallow, JG, Garland, T, Proctor, DN, Carter, PA & Sieck, GC 1999, 'Effects of genetic selection and voluntary activity on the medial gastrocnemius muscle in house mice', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 87, no. 6, pp. 2326-2333.

Effects of genetic selection and voluntary activity on the medial gastrocnemius muscle in house mice. / Zhan, Wen Zhi; Swallow, John G.; Garland, Theodore; Proctor, David Nathan; Carter, Patrick A.; Sieck, Gary C.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 87, No. 6, 12.1999, p. 2326-2333.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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