Effects of individual and cooperative computer-assisted instruction on student performance and attitudes

David W. Dalton, Michael J. Hannafin, Simon Richard Hooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

In this study, the performance and attitudes toward instruction of learners working individually on a computer-based sex education lesson were compared with those of learners working cooperatively in dyads. A tatal of 60 eighth-graders received treatments that either required individual work or encouraged cooperation with a partner. Results indicated that students who worked cooperatively significantly outperformed those who worked individually. On an attitude measure, interactions were detected between instructional method and gender, as well as among instructional method, gender, and ability. High-ability males and females reported comparable attitudes toward each instructional method, but ratings for low-ability students were differentiated according to instructional method: Low-ability males responded most favorably, while low-ability females responded least favorably to individualized methods, and low-ability females responded most favorably and low-ability males least favorably to cooperative methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)15-24
Number of pages10
JournalEducational Technology Research and Development
Volume37
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1989

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Effects of individual and cooperative computer-assisted instruction on student performance and attitudes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this