Effects of motivational and volitional messages on attitudes toward engineering: Comparing text messages with animated messages delivered by a pedagogical agent

Chan Min Kim, John M. Keller, Amy L. Baylor

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study tested strategies incorporating change management, motivational, and volitional characteristics in order to facilitate positive attitudes toward engineering. In an introductory engineering course, the strategies were distributed via email to two groups: one received the strategies with an animated pedagogical agent (Agent-MVM) and the other received the strategies in a text-only format (Text-MVM). The effects of the strategies on attitudes were compared with the control group which received neither formats of the strategy message. Contrary to expectations, the results indicated that the attitudes of the Agent-MVM group were not significantly more positive than the Text-MVM group or the control group. Possible explanations for the findings are discussed along with implications and possibilities for future studies.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationIADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, CELDA 2007
Pages317-320
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
EventIADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, CELDA 2007 - Algarve, Portugal
Duration: Dec 7 2007Dec 9 2007

Publication series

NameIADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, CELDA 2007

Conference

ConferenceIADIS International Conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in Digital Age, CELDA 2007
CountryPortugal
CityAlgarve
Period12/7/0712/9/07

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Artificial Intelligence
  • Education

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