Effects of perceived disability on persuasiveness of computer-synthesized speech

Steven E. Stern, John W. Mullennix, Stephen Wilson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Are perceptions of computer-synthesized speech altered by the belief that the person using this technology is disabled? In a 2 × 2 factorial design, participants completed an attitude pretest and were randomly assigned to watch an actor deliver a persuasive appeal under 1 of the following 4 conditions: disabled or nondisabled using normal speech and disabled or nondisabled using computer-synthesized speech. Participants then completed a posttest survey and a series of questionnaires assessing perceptions of voice, speaker, and message. Natural speech was perceived more favorably and was more persuasive than computer-synthesized speech. When the speaker was perceived to be speech-disabled, however, this difference diminished. This finding suggests that negatively viewed assistive technologies will be perceived more favorably when used by people with disabilities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)411-417
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Applied Psychology
Volume87
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002

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Self-Help Devices
Disabled Persons
Technology
Surveys and Questionnaires

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

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Effects of perceived disability on persuasiveness of computer-synthesized speech. / Stern, Steven E.; Mullennix, John W.; Wilson, Stephen.

In: Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 87, No. 2, 01.01.2002, p. 411-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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