Effects of physical activity on teen smoking cessation

Kimberly Horn, Geri Dino, Steven A. Branstetter, Jianjun Zhang, N. Noerachmanto, Traci Jarrett, Melissa Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To understand the influence of physical activity on teen smoking-cessation outcomes. METHODS: Teens (N = 233; 14-19 years of age) from West Virginia high schools who smoked >1 cigarette in the previous 30 days were included. High schools with >300 students were selected randomly and assigned to brief intervention (BI), Not on Tobacco (N-O-T) (a proven teen cessation program), or N-O-T plus a physical activity module (N-O-T+FIT). Quit rates were determined 3 and 6 months after baseline by using self-classified and 7-day point prevalence quit rates, and carbon monoxide validation was obtained at the 3-month follow-up evaluation. RESULTS: Trends for observed and imputed self-classified and 7-day point prevalence rates indicated that teens in the N-O-T+FIT group had significantly higher cessation rates compared with those in the N-O-T and BI groups. Effect sizes were large. Overall, girls quit more successfully with N-O-T compared with BI (relative risk [RR]: >∞) 3 months after baseline, and boys responded better to N-O-T+FIT than to BI (RR: 2-3) or to N-O-T (RR: 1-2). Youths in the N-O-T+FIT group, compared with those in the N-O-T group, had greater likelihood of cessation (RR: 1.48) at 6 months. The control group included an unusually large proportion of participants in the precontemplation stage at enrollment, but there were no significant differences in outcomes between BI and N-O-T (z=0.94; P=.17) or N-O-T+FIT (z=1.12; P=.13) participants in the precontemplation stage. CONCLUSIONS: Adding physical activity to N-O-T may enhance cessation success, particularly among boys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPediatrics
Volume128
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2011

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Smoking Cessation
Tobacco
Exercise
Carbon Monoxide
Tobacco Products
Students

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Horn, K., Dino, G., Branstetter, S. A., Zhang, J., Noerachmanto, N., Jarrett, T., & Taylor, M. (2011). Effects of physical activity on teen smoking cessation. Pediatrics, 128(4). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-2599
Horn, Kimberly ; Dino, Geri ; Branstetter, Steven A. ; Zhang, Jianjun ; Noerachmanto, N. ; Jarrett, Traci ; Taylor, Melissa. / Effects of physical activity on teen smoking cessation. In: Pediatrics. 2011 ; Vol. 128, No. 4.
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Horn, K, Dino, G, Branstetter, SA, Zhang, J, Noerachmanto, N, Jarrett, T & Taylor, M 2011, 'Effects of physical activity on teen smoking cessation', Pediatrics, vol. 128, no. 4. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-2599

Effects of physical activity on teen smoking cessation. / Horn, Kimberly; Dino, Geri; Branstetter, Steven A.; Zhang, Jianjun; Noerachmanto, N.; Jarrett, Traci; Taylor, Melissa.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 128, No. 4, 01.10.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Horn, Kimberly

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N2 - OBJECTIVE: To understand the influence of physical activity on teen smoking-cessation outcomes. METHODS: Teens (N = 233; 14-19 years of age) from West Virginia high schools who smoked >1 cigarette in the previous 30 days were included. High schools with >300 students were selected randomly and assigned to brief intervention (BI), Not on Tobacco (N-O-T) (a proven teen cessation program), or N-O-T plus a physical activity module (N-O-T+FIT). Quit rates were determined 3 and 6 months after baseline by using self-classified and 7-day point prevalence quit rates, and carbon monoxide validation was obtained at the 3-month follow-up evaluation. RESULTS: Trends for observed and imputed self-classified and 7-day point prevalence rates indicated that teens in the N-O-T+FIT group had significantly higher cessation rates compared with those in the N-O-T and BI groups. Effect sizes were large. Overall, girls quit more successfully with N-O-T compared with BI (relative risk [RR]: >∞) 3 months after baseline, and boys responded better to N-O-T+FIT than to BI (RR: 2-3) or to N-O-T (RR: 1-2). Youths in the N-O-T+FIT group, compared with those in the N-O-T group, had greater likelihood of cessation (RR: 1.48) at 6 months. The control group included an unusually large proportion of participants in the precontemplation stage at enrollment, but there were no significant differences in outcomes between BI and N-O-T (z=0.94; P=.17) or N-O-T+FIT (z=1.12; P=.13) participants in the precontemplation stage. CONCLUSIONS: Adding physical activity to N-O-T may enhance cessation success, particularly among boys.

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Horn K, Dino G, Branstetter SA, Zhang J, Noerachmanto N, Jarrett T et al. Effects of physical activity on teen smoking cessation. Pediatrics. 2011 Oct 1;128(4). https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2010-2599