Effects of practice on final position reproduction

Slobodan Jaric, Daniel M. Corcos, Mark Latash

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three subjects practiced fast, accurate 36° elbow flexion movements to a 2.5° target for 14 sessions of 100 trials (total, 1400 trials). Subjects then returned for a 15th experimental session in which they were asked to perform 15 movements under identical conditions to the practice condition. They were then tested under three experimental conditions without visual feedback: (1) identical to the practice conditions, (2) with small shifts in starting position (± 3° of the practiced starting position), that were insufficient for subjective discrimination and, therefore, subjects were instructed to repeat the practiced movements; and (3) with a large shift in starting position (range, ± 15° of the practiced starting position), under the instruction to move to the same target. Experimental conditions 2 and 3 demonstrated that shifts in starting position were partially correlated with shifts in final position. These results are interpreted from the point of view of the equilibrium-point hypothesis of motor control.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)129-134
Number of pages6
JournalExperimental Brain Research
Volume91
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 1992

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Sensory Feedback
Elbow
Reproduction

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Jaric, Slobodan ; Corcos, Daniel M. ; Latash, Mark. / Effects of practice on final position reproduction. In: Experimental Brain Research. 1992 ; Vol. 91, No. 1. pp. 129-134.
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Effects of practice on final position reproduction. / Jaric, Slobodan; Corcos, Daniel M.; Latash, Mark.

In: Experimental Brain Research, Vol. 91, No. 1, 01.10.1992, p. 129-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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