Effects of programmed gain strategies on performance and carcass characteristics of steers

H. V. Knoblich, F. L. Fluharty, S. C. Loerch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

23 Scopus citations

Abstract

In Trial 1, 161 Angus x Simmental crossbred steers (initial BW 305 ± 1.0 kg) were used in a completely randomized design experiment to determine the effects of intake restriction and programmed gain on cattle performance and carcass composition and characteristics. Five feeding systems were tested using step-wise increases in programmed intake level. Initially steers were fed to gain 1.13 kg/d. Intake was then increased to achieve a gain of 1.36 kg/ d. At the end of the feeding period, steers had ad libitum access to feed. Duration of intake restriction and the period of unrestricted intake was varied. Feeding steers at restricted intakes and then increasing daily gain by increasing feed intake using four different schedules all reduced (P < .05) daily feed intake and total feed intake compared with providing ad libitum access to feed throughout the trial. Furthermore, daily feed efficiency was increased (P < .05) by two of the feeding systems compared with offering ad libitum access to feed throughout the trial. The feeding system used did not affect (P > .10) quality grade of the carcasses. In Trial 2, 77 individually penned Angus x Simmental crossbred steers (initial BW 273 ± 1.2 kg) were used to determine the effects of various feed intake restriction systems. For systems 1 through 4, multiple periods of restriction and realimentation were investigated; the duration and magnitude of restriction were varied. Feed intake was not restricted for steers in system 5. The feed restriction systems used in this experiment did not result in decreased total feed intake or changes in carcass composition as compared with offering ad libitum access to feed. Reducing total energy intake seems to be a prerequisite to altering feed efficiency of steers in limit-feeding systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3094-3102
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of animal science
Volume75
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1997

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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