Effects of rumen-protected Capsicum oleoresin on immune responses in dairy cows intravenously challenged with lipopolysaccharide

J. Oh, M. Harper, F. Giallongo, D. M. Bravo, E. H. Wall, A. N. Hristov

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7 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of rumen-protected Capsicum oleoresin (RPC) on productivity and immune responses including feed intake, milk yield and composition, white and red blood cells, lipid peroxidation, and blood concentration of cortisol, haptoglobin, glucose, and insulin in lactating dairy cows experimentally challenged with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The experiment was a replicated 3 × 3 Latin square design with 9 multiparous Holstein cows in three 28-d periods. Treatments were 0 (control), 100, and 200 mg of RPC/cow per day, mixed with small portions of the total mixed ration and top-dressed. Bacterial LPS was intravenously administered at 1.0 μg/kg of body weight in the last week of each experimental period, and blood samples were collected at 0, 2, 4, 8, and 24 h after administration. Dry matter intake, milk yield, and white blood cells including neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes, and eosinophils were decreased, and rectal temperature, hemoglobin, and serum concentrations of cortisol and haptoglobin were increased by LPS. Red blood cells, platelets, and plasma concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances were not affected by LPS. Dry matter intake, milk yield, and milk composition in the 5 d post-LPS challenge were not affected by RPC. Rectal temperature, white blood cells, red blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets were also not affected by RPC. Compared with the control, RPC tended to decrease cortisol at 2 h following LPS challenge and decreased haptoglobin concentration in serum across sampling points. Concentration of thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in plasma was decreased by RPC at 24 h post-LPS challenge. Glucose and insulin were not affected by RPC, but serum insulin concentration at 8 h was lowered by RPC compared to the control. Collectively, RPC had no or subtle effects on feed intake, milk yield and composition, rectal temperature, white and red blood cells, and serum glucose and insulin concentration in dairy cows challenged by LPS. However, RPC tended to decrease cortisol and decreased concentrations of haptoglobin and thiobarbituric acid reactive substances in blood following LPS challenge. Data suggest that dietary supplementation of RPC may modulate acute phase responses induced by bacterial infection in lactating dairy cows.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1902-1913
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of dairy science
Volume100
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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