Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based direct-fed microbial and exogenous enzyme products on enteric methane emission and productivity in lactating dairy cows

J. Oh, M. Harper, A. Melgar, D. M.Paulus Compart, A. N. Hristov

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The objective of this experiment was to investigate the effects of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based direct-fed microbial product (SDM) and an exogenous enzyme product (ENZ) on enteric methane emission, milk yield and composition, total-tract digestibility of nutrients, ruminal fermentation, and nitrogen excretion and secretion in lactating dairy cows. Eighteen Holstein cows were used in a 3 × 3 Latin square design experiment with three 28-d periods. Treatments were (1) control (no additive), (2) 28 g of SDM/d per cow, or (3) 10 g of ENZ/d per cow. Treatments were top-dressed at the time of feeding. The basal diet consisted of (dry matter basis) 60% forage and 40% concentrates and contained 16.5% crude protein and 32.0% neutral detergent fiber. Treatments had no effect on enteric methane production, yield (methane per kg of dry matter intake, DMI), or intensity (methane per kg of energy-corrected milk yield). Carbon dioxide production was similar among treatments. Compared with control, SDM increased milk yield by 2 kg/d without affecting DMI or feed efficiency. Supplementation of the diet with ENZ did not affect DMI, milk yield, or feed efficiency. Concentrations and yields of milk fat, true protein, and lactose, and energy-corrected milk yield were not different among treatments. Neither SDM nor ENZ had an effect on total-tract digestibility of nutrients or nitrogen excretion and secretion. Concentration of total volatile fatty acids (VFA) in ruminal fluid was increased by both SDM and ENZ, and rumen pH was decreased by SDM compared with the control. At levels similar to the control DMI, the increased concentration of VFA in ruminal fluid of cows receiving SDM suggests an increased postruminal supply of energy and may partly explain the increased milk yield with that treatment. However, it is important to note that milk composition and energy-corrected milk yield were not affected by treatment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6065-6075
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of dairy science
Volume102
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 2019

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Genetics

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