Effects of serial grafting, ontogeny, and genotype on rooting of Quercus rubra cuttings

James J. Zaczek, Kim C. Steiner, Charles W. Heuser, Walter M. Tzilkowski

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Bud grafts, up to three series over 3 years, were made on seedling and tree rootstocks using scions from juvenile and mature northern red oak (Quercus rubra L.). Serial grafts on juvenile rootstock used buds collected from shoots developed from grafted scions of prior years. Rooting trials were performed in years 2 and 3 with shoot cuttings developed in situ on seedlings and trees and developed from successful grafts. Without grafting, cuttings from seedlings rooted more frequently and had more roots than cuttings from trees. Significant variation within maturation groups due to genotype and ontogeny obscured absolute between-group differences. Grafting scions of juvenile origins onto seedling rootstock had little effect on percent rooting and the number of roots for cuttings. Grafting onto seedling rootstock tended to increase rooting and the number of roots for cuttings from mature origins, but the effect was not progressive with increasing grafting series. Grafting onto mature rootstock did not affect rooting of cuttings from juvenile or mature origins collected in the first growing season after grafting, but cuttings from juvenile scions collected in the second growing season exhibited reduced percent rooting compared with cuttings from seedling controls. Results suggest that northern red oak buds are predetermined in their developmental fate relative to rooting parameters and are only minimally influenced by grafting. The true effect of grafting on the subsequent rooting of cuttings may be mediated through processes other than rejuvenation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)123-131
Number of pages9
JournalCanadian Journal of Forest Research
Volume36
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

Fingerprint

plant cuttings
Quercus rubra
grafting (plants)
rooting
ontogeny
genotype
rootstock
rootstocks
seedling
scions
seedlings
bud
buds
growing season
shoot
effect
cutting (process)
shoots
maturation

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Global and Planetary Change
  • Forestry
  • Ecology

Cite this

Zaczek, James J. ; Steiner, Kim C. ; Heuser, Charles W. ; Tzilkowski, Walter M. / Effects of serial grafting, ontogeny, and genotype on rooting of Quercus rubra cuttings. In: Canadian Journal of Forest Research. 2006 ; Vol. 36, No. 1. pp. 123-131.
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Effects of serial grafting, ontogeny, and genotype on rooting of Quercus rubra cuttings. / Zaczek, James J.; Steiner, Kim C.; Heuser, Charles W.; Tzilkowski, Walter M.

In: Canadian Journal of Forest Research, Vol. 36, No. 1, 01.01.2006, p. 123-131.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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