Abstract

Statins have been associated with improved survival in cancer patients and with decreased incidence and mortality of sepsis in different populations. Our objective was to assess whether newly diagnosed cancer patients on statins had decreased incidence and mortality of sepsis. We analyzed a US database and included 119,379 patients with a new cancer diagnosis (age 55 (50–60) years, 61% female), 19,468 of them (16%) receiving statins. Statins users were older and presented more comorbidities. After adjustment for baseline characteristics, statin use was associated with decreased death hazard (HR 0.897, 95% CI 0.851–0.945, p < 0.0001). The cumulative incidence of sepsis reached 10% at 5 years but statin use was not significantly associated with sepsis hazard (subdistribution hazard ratio 0.990, 95% CI 0.932–1.050, p = 0.73), including in sensitivity analyzes in patients with hematological malignancy or sepsis within 1 year. In patients subsequently hospitalized with sepsis, hospital mortality was 23% and statin use was not associated with mortality (odds ratio 0.952, 95% CI 0.829–1.091, p = 0.48), including in sensitivity analyzes in patients with septic shock and use of statins at the time of sepsis. In summary, treatment with statin at the time of new cancer diagnosis is not associated with a decreased incidence and mortality of sepsis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number3427
JournalJournal of Clinical Medicine
Volume10
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2021

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)

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