Effects of steam-vacuuming and hot water spray wash on the microflora of refrigerated beef carcass surface tissue inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria innocua, and Clostridium sporogenes

Warren J. Dorsa, Catherine Nettles Cutter, Gregory R. Siragusa

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The fates of several bacterial populations on beef carcass surfaces were examined immediately following hot water washes (W) delivered through a beef carcass wash cabinet or application of steam-vacuum (SV). Additionally, the long-range effectiveness of W and SV and several bacterial populations was also determined during storage up to 21 days at 5°C under vacuum-packaged conditions. Fresh, unaltered bovine feces spiked with antibiotic-resistant strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria innocua, and Clostridium sporogenes were used to inoculate beef carcass tissue prior to W or SV treatment. All treatments were equally effective as is indicated by bacterial populations immediately following any of the treatments (P > 0.05); however, the combination of SV followed by W consistently produce arithmetically greater bacterial reductions. In general, all treatments produced initial reductions of up to 2.7 log CFU/cm2 for APC, lactic and bacteria, and L. innocua, but by 4 days bacterial numbers had increased to levels of at least 7 log CFU/cm2. E. coli O157:H7 was initially reduced by as much as 3.4 log CFU/cm2 and did not grow to original inoculation levels for the duration of the experiment. Vegetative counts of C. sporogenes were initially reduced by as much as 3.4 log CFU/cm2, and numbers continued to decline for the duration of the study. These results indicate that the use of W and SV effectively reduces bacterial populations from beef carcass tissue immediatley after treatment. Additionally, storage of treated tissue up to 21 days at 5°C did not appear to offer any competitive advantage to potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)114-119
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Food Protection
Volume60
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1997

Fingerprint

Clostridium sporogenes
Listeria
Listeria innocua
beef carcasses
Escherichia coli O157
Clostridium
Steam
Vacuum
steam
microorganisms
Water
water
Population
duration
Feces
feces
antibiotics
tissues
Red Meat
Milk

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Food Science
  • Microbiology

Cite this

@article{824f3562100d4233b44d2c31d60496e6,
title = "Effects of steam-vacuuming and hot water spray wash on the microflora of refrigerated beef carcass surface tissue inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria innocua, and Clostridium sporogenes",
abstract = "The fates of several bacterial populations on beef carcass surfaces were examined immediately following hot water washes (W) delivered through a beef carcass wash cabinet or application of steam-vacuum (SV). Additionally, the long-range effectiveness of W and SV and several bacterial populations was also determined during storage up to 21 days at 5°C under vacuum-packaged conditions. Fresh, unaltered bovine feces spiked with antibiotic-resistant strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria innocua, and Clostridium sporogenes were used to inoculate beef carcass tissue prior to W or SV treatment. All treatments were equally effective as is indicated by bacterial populations immediately following any of the treatments (P > 0.05); however, the combination of SV followed by W consistently produce arithmetically greater bacterial reductions. In general, all treatments produced initial reductions of up to 2.7 log CFU/cm2 for APC, lactic and bacteria, and L. innocua, but by 4 days bacterial numbers had increased to levels of at least 7 log CFU/cm2. E. coli O157:H7 was initially reduced by as much as 3.4 log CFU/cm2 and did not grow to original inoculation levels for the duration of the experiment. Vegetative counts of C. sporogenes were initially reduced by as much as 3.4 log CFU/cm2, and numbers continued to decline for the duration of the study. These results indicate that the use of W and SV effectively reduces bacterial populations from beef carcass tissue immediatley after treatment. Additionally, storage of treated tissue up to 21 days at 5°C did not appear to offer any competitive advantage to potentially pathogenic microorganisms.",
author = "Dorsa, {Warren J.} and Cutter, {Catherine Nettles} and Siragusa, {Gregory R.}",
year = "1997",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4315/0362-028X-60.2.114",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "60",
pages = "114--119",
journal = "Journal of Food Protection",
issn = "0362-028X",
publisher = "International Association for Food Protection",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of steam-vacuuming and hot water spray wash on the microflora of refrigerated beef carcass surface tissue inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria innocua, and Clostridium sporogenes

AU - Dorsa, Warren J.

AU - Cutter, Catherine Nettles

AU - Siragusa, Gregory R.

PY - 1997/1/1

Y1 - 1997/1/1

N2 - The fates of several bacterial populations on beef carcass surfaces were examined immediately following hot water washes (W) delivered through a beef carcass wash cabinet or application of steam-vacuum (SV). Additionally, the long-range effectiveness of W and SV and several bacterial populations was also determined during storage up to 21 days at 5°C under vacuum-packaged conditions. Fresh, unaltered bovine feces spiked with antibiotic-resistant strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria innocua, and Clostridium sporogenes were used to inoculate beef carcass tissue prior to W or SV treatment. All treatments were equally effective as is indicated by bacterial populations immediately following any of the treatments (P > 0.05); however, the combination of SV followed by W consistently produce arithmetically greater bacterial reductions. In general, all treatments produced initial reductions of up to 2.7 log CFU/cm2 for APC, lactic and bacteria, and L. innocua, but by 4 days bacterial numbers had increased to levels of at least 7 log CFU/cm2. E. coli O157:H7 was initially reduced by as much as 3.4 log CFU/cm2 and did not grow to original inoculation levels for the duration of the experiment. Vegetative counts of C. sporogenes were initially reduced by as much as 3.4 log CFU/cm2, and numbers continued to decline for the duration of the study. These results indicate that the use of W and SV effectively reduces bacterial populations from beef carcass tissue immediatley after treatment. Additionally, storage of treated tissue up to 21 days at 5°C did not appear to offer any competitive advantage to potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

AB - The fates of several bacterial populations on beef carcass surfaces were examined immediately following hot water washes (W) delivered through a beef carcass wash cabinet or application of steam-vacuum (SV). Additionally, the long-range effectiveness of W and SV and several bacterial populations was also determined during storage up to 21 days at 5°C under vacuum-packaged conditions. Fresh, unaltered bovine feces spiked with antibiotic-resistant strains of Escherichia coli O157:H7, Listeria innocua, and Clostridium sporogenes were used to inoculate beef carcass tissue prior to W or SV treatment. All treatments were equally effective as is indicated by bacterial populations immediately following any of the treatments (P > 0.05); however, the combination of SV followed by W consistently produce arithmetically greater bacterial reductions. In general, all treatments produced initial reductions of up to 2.7 log CFU/cm2 for APC, lactic and bacteria, and L. innocua, but by 4 days bacterial numbers had increased to levels of at least 7 log CFU/cm2. E. coli O157:H7 was initially reduced by as much as 3.4 log CFU/cm2 and did not grow to original inoculation levels for the duration of the experiment. Vegetative counts of C. sporogenes were initially reduced by as much as 3.4 log CFU/cm2, and numbers continued to decline for the duration of the study. These results indicate that the use of W and SV effectively reduces bacterial populations from beef carcass tissue immediatley after treatment. Additionally, storage of treated tissue up to 21 days at 5°C did not appear to offer any competitive advantage to potentially pathogenic microorganisms.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030934682&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030934682&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4315/0362-028X-60.2.114

DO - 10.4315/0362-028X-60.2.114

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0030934682

VL - 60

SP - 114

EP - 119

JO - Journal of Food Protection

JF - Journal of Food Protection

SN - 0362-028X

IS - 2

ER -