Effects of the main gas path pressure field on rim seal flows in a stationary linear cascade

Jeffrey Gibson, Karen Thole, Jesse Christophel, LCurtis Memory

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Rim seals in the turbine section of gas turbine engines aim to reduce the amount of purge air required to prevent the ingress of hot mainstream gas into the under-platform space. A stationary, linear cascade was designed, built, and benchmarked to study the effect of the interaction between the pressure fields from an upstream vane row and downstream blade row on hot gas ingress for engine-realistic rim seal geometries. The pressure field of the downstream blade row was modeled using a bluff body designed to produce the pressure distortion of a moving blade. Sealing effectiveness data for the baseline seal indicated that there was little to no ingress with a purge rate greater than 1% of the main gas path flow. Adiabatic endwall effectiveness data downstream in the trench between the vane and blade showed a high degree of mixing. Extending the seal feature associated with the vane endwall indicated better sealing than the baseline design. Steady computational predictions were found to overpredict the sealing effectiveness due to underpredicted mixing in the trench.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationHeat Transfer
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
ISBN (Electronic)9780791856734, 9780791856734
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015
EventASME Turbo Expo 2015: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition, GT 2015 - Montreal, Canada
Duration: Jun 15 2015Jun 19 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings of the ASME Turbo Expo
Volume5C

Other

OtherASME Turbo Expo 2015: Turbine Technical Conference and Exposition, GT 2015
CountryCanada
CityMontreal
Period6/15/156/19/15

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Engineering(all)

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