Effects of therapist general self-disclosure and countertransference disclosure on ratings of the therapist and session

David Myers, Jeffrey A. Hayes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

55 Scopus citations

Abstract

Therapist decisions about self-disclosure depend theoretically upon both content and context, such as the quality of the therapeutic relationship. In this analogue study, 224 undergraduates viewed 1 of 3 videos for which the working alliance was described as positive or negative and in which a therapist made general self-disclosures, countertransference disclosures, or no disclosures. Interaction effects indicated that participants rated sessions as deeper and the therapist as more expert when the therapist made general disclosures compared to no disclosures, but only when the alliance was positive. When the alliance was negative, participants perceived sessions as shallower and the therapist as less expert when the therapist made either general or countertransference disclosures compared to no disclosures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-185
Number of pages13
JournalPsychotherapy
Volume43
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2006

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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