Effects of urban land-use on largescale stonerollers in the Mobile River Basin, Birmingham, AL

D. Iwanowicz, M. C. Black, Vicki Suzette Blazer, H. Zappia, W. Bryant

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

During the spring and fall of 2001 and the spring of 2002 a study was conducted to evaluate the health of the largescale stoneroller (Campostoma oligolepis) populations in streams along an urban land-use gradient. Sites were selected from a pool of naturally similar sub-basins (eco-region, basin size, and geology) of the Mobile River basin (MRB), using an index of urban intensity derived from infrastructure, socioeconomic, and land-use data. This urban land-use gradient (ULUG) is a multimetric indicator of urban intensity, ranging from 0 (background) to 100 (intense urbanization). Campostoma sp. have been used previously as indicators of stream health and are common species found in all sites within the MRB. Endpoints used to determine the effects of urban land-use on the largescale stoneroller included total glutathione, histology, hepatic apoptosis, condition factor and external lesions. Liver glutathione levels were positively associated with increasing urban land-use (r2 = 0.94). Histopathological examination determined that some abnormalities and lesions were correlated with the ULUG and generally increased in prevalence or severity with increasing urbanization. Liver macrophage aggregates were positively correlated to the ULUG. The occurrence of nucleosomal ladders (indicating apoptotic cell death) did not correspond with urban intensity in a linear fashion. Apoptosis, as well as prevalence and severity of a myxozoan parasite, appeared to have a hormetic dose–response relationship. The majority of the biomarkers suggested fish health was compromised in areas where the ULUG ≥ 36.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)608-621
Number of pages14
JournalEcotoxicology
Volume25
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

Fingerprint

Rivers
Land use
Catchments
Urbanization
river basin
land use
Glutathione
Liver
Health
Geology
Apoptosis
apoptosis
Histology
lesion
Fishes
Parasites
Cell Death
Biomarkers
Macrophages
urbanization

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Toxicology
  • Management, Monitoring, Policy and Law
  • Health, Toxicology and Mutagenesis

Cite this

Iwanowicz, D. ; Black, M. C. ; Blazer, Vicki Suzette ; Zappia, H. ; Bryant, W. / Effects of urban land-use on largescale stonerollers in the Mobile River Basin, Birmingham, AL. In: Ecotoxicology. 2016 ; Vol. 25, No. 3. pp. 608-621.
@article{d8b1235efbe54d479c90ff5823808ff7,
title = "Effects of urban land-use on largescale stonerollers in the Mobile River Basin, Birmingham, AL",
abstract = "During the spring and fall of 2001 and the spring of 2002 a study was conducted to evaluate the health of the largescale stoneroller (Campostoma oligolepis) populations in streams along an urban land-use gradient. Sites were selected from a pool of naturally similar sub-basins (eco-region, basin size, and geology) of the Mobile River basin (MRB), using an index of urban intensity derived from infrastructure, socioeconomic, and land-use data. This urban land-use gradient (ULUG) is a multimetric indicator of urban intensity, ranging from 0 (background) to 100 (intense urbanization). Campostoma sp. have been used previously as indicators of stream health and are common species found in all sites within the MRB. Endpoints used to determine the effects of urban land-use on the largescale stoneroller included total glutathione, histology, hepatic apoptosis, condition factor and external lesions. Liver glutathione levels were positively associated with increasing urban land-use (r2 = 0.94). Histopathological examination determined that some abnormalities and lesions were correlated with the ULUG and generally increased in prevalence or severity with increasing urbanization. Liver macrophage aggregates were positively correlated to the ULUG. The occurrence of nucleosomal ladders (indicating apoptotic cell death) did not correspond with urban intensity in a linear fashion. Apoptosis, as well as prevalence and severity of a myxozoan parasite, appeared to have a hormetic dose–response relationship. The majority of the biomarkers suggested fish health was compromised in areas where the ULUG ≥ 36.",
author = "D. Iwanowicz and Black, {M. C.} and Blazer, {Vicki Suzette} and H. Zappia and W. Bryant",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s10646-016-1620-3",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "25",
pages = "608--621",
journal = "Ecotoxicology",
issn = "0963-9292",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

Iwanowicz, D, Black, MC, Blazer, VS, Zappia, H & Bryant, W 2016, 'Effects of urban land-use on largescale stonerollers in the Mobile River Basin, Birmingham, AL', Ecotoxicology, vol. 25, no. 3, pp. 608-621. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10646-016-1620-3

Effects of urban land-use on largescale stonerollers in the Mobile River Basin, Birmingham, AL. / Iwanowicz, D.; Black, M. C.; Blazer, Vicki Suzette; Zappia, H.; Bryant, W.

In: Ecotoxicology, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.04.2016, p. 608-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of urban land-use on largescale stonerollers in the Mobile River Basin, Birmingham, AL

AU - Iwanowicz, D.

AU - Black, M. C.

AU - Blazer, Vicki Suzette

AU - Zappia, H.

AU - Bryant, W.

PY - 2016/4/1

Y1 - 2016/4/1

N2 - During the spring and fall of 2001 and the spring of 2002 a study was conducted to evaluate the health of the largescale stoneroller (Campostoma oligolepis) populations in streams along an urban land-use gradient. Sites were selected from a pool of naturally similar sub-basins (eco-region, basin size, and geology) of the Mobile River basin (MRB), using an index of urban intensity derived from infrastructure, socioeconomic, and land-use data. This urban land-use gradient (ULUG) is a multimetric indicator of urban intensity, ranging from 0 (background) to 100 (intense urbanization). Campostoma sp. have been used previously as indicators of stream health and are common species found in all sites within the MRB. Endpoints used to determine the effects of urban land-use on the largescale stoneroller included total glutathione, histology, hepatic apoptosis, condition factor and external lesions. Liver glutathione levels were positively associated with increasing urban land-use (r2 = 0.94). Histopathological examination determined that some abnormalities and lesions were correlated with the ULUG and generally increased in prevalence or severity with increasing urbanization. Liver macrophage aggregates were positively correlated to the ULUG. The occurrence of nucleosomal ladders (indicating apoptotic cell death) did not correspond with urban intensity in a linear fashion. Apoptosis, as well as prevalence and severity of a myxozoan parasite, appeared to have a hormetic dose–response relationship. The majority of the biomarkers suggested fish health was compromised in areas where the ULUG ≥ 36.

AB - During the spring and fall of 2001 and the spring of 2002 a study was conducted to evaluate the health of the largescale stoneroller (Campostoma oligolepis) populations in streams along an urban land-use gradient. Sites were selected from a pool of naturally similar sub-basins (eco-region, basin size, and geology) of the Mobile River basin (MRB), using an index of urban intensity derived from infrastructure, socioeconomic, and land-use data. This urban land-use gradient (ULUG) is a multimetric indicator of urban intensity, ranging from 0 (background) to 100 (intense urbanization). Campostoma sp. have been used previously as indicators of stream health and are common species found in all sites within the MRB. Endpoints used to determine the effects of urban land-use on the largescale stoneroller included total glutathione, histology, hepatic apoptosis, condition factor and external lesions. Liver glutathione levels were positively associated with increasing urban land-use (r2 = 0.94). Histopathological examination determined that some abnormalities and lesions were correlated with the ULUG and generally increased in prevalence or severity with increasing urbanization. Liver macrophage aggregates were positively correlated to the ULUG. The occurrence of nucleosomal ladders (indicating apoptotic cell death) did not correspond with urban intensity in a linear fashion. Apoptosis, as well as prevalence and severity of a myxozoan parasite, appeared to have a hormetic dose–response relationship. The majority of the biomarkers suggested fish health was compromised in areas where the ULUG ≥ 36.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964200312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84964200312&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s10646-016-1620-3

DO - 10.1007/s10646-016-1620-3

M3 - Article

C2 - 26892787

AN - SCOPUS:84964200312

VL - 25

SP - 608

EP - 621

JO - Ecotoxicology

JF - Ecotoxicology

SN - 0963-9292

IS - 3

ER -