Effects of workload on communication processes in decision making teams

an empirical study with implications for training

Julie Marie Urban, Clint A. Bowers, Susan D. Monday, Ben B. Morgan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Recent empirical studies of decision making in teams demonstrate that team structure and workload significantly influence team performance. Therefore, it is necessary to create training interventions that will optimize performance within existing team structures and workload levels. Several studies suggest that team processes are the most likely target for this type of intervention. The current investigation sought to develop a laboratory analogue of a common team structure (i.e., the 'product team') and to assess the effects of high and low workload on team performance processes within this structure. The results suggest that different communication behaviors facilitate effective performance under low and high workload.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1233-1237
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
Volume2
StatePublished - 1993

Fingerprint

workload
Decision making
decision making
communication
Communication
performance
communication behavior

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

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Effects of workload on communication processes in decision making teams : an empirical study with implications for training. / Urban, Julie Marie; Bowers, Clint A.; Monday, Susan D.; Morgan, Ben B.

In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, Vol. 2, 1993, p. 1233-1237.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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