EFFICACY OF BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES WITH ADOLESCENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES AND BEHAVIOR DISORDERS

Charles A. Hughes, William J. Therrien, David Lee

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This chapter presents a quantitative and qualitative review of research on the use of behavioral self-management (BSM) procedures with adolescents with learning disabilities or behavioral disorders (LD/BD). These procedures included self-monitoring, self-evaluation, self-reinforcement, self-instruction, and packages containing two or more BSM techniques. Twenty studies published from 1981 to 2002 were identified and analyzed. The analysis centered on a series of questions addressing overall effectiveness of the procedures, whether BSM produced socially valid changes, where the changes occurred (i.e. special education or general education setting), whether maintenance and generalization of the target behavior(s) occurred, and if students began to use BSM procedures on their own. Results showed a mean percentage of nonoverlapping data (PND) of 80 indicating that BSM procedures are, overall, an effective approach to behavior change. It also appears that in some instances, these changes are socially valid in that the performance of students with LD/BD can be improved to the level of nondisabled peers. Interventions consisting of a combination of self-management procedures appear to be the most effective, however self-monitoring alone has similar impact. BSM also appears to be effective with a wide variety of behaviors, albeit with relatively discrete behaviors (versus more complex chains of behaviors used in strategic problem-solving). While there is some evidence that target behaviors were generalized and maintained, many of the studies reviewed did not measure it. Also of concern was the apparent lack of student involvement in selecting target behaviors, goal setting, forms of recording etc as well as the fact that no study measured student ability to apply BSM procedures after intervention. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationResearch in Secondary Schools
Pages1-28
Number of pages28
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004

Publication series

NameAdvances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities
Volume17
ISSN (Print)0735-004X

Fingerprint

behavior disorder
learning behavior
learning disability
adolescent
management
student
monitoring
general education
special education
reinforcement
recording
instruction
lack
ability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Rehabilitation

Cite this

Hughes, C. A., Therrien, W. J., & Lee, D. (2004). EFFICACY OF BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES WITH ADOLESCENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES AND BEHAVIOR DISORDERS. In Research in Secondary Schools (pp. 1-28). (Advances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities; Vol. 17). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0735-004X(04)17001-8
Hughes, Charles A. ; Therrien, William J. ; Lee, David. / EFFICACY OF BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES WITH ADOLESCENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES AND BEHAVIOR DISORDERS. Research in Secondary Schools. 2004. pp. 1-28 (Advances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities).
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Hughes, CA, Therrien, WJ & Lee, D 2004, EFFICACY OF BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES WITH ADOLESCENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES AND BEHAVIOR DISORDERS. in Research in Secondary Schools. Advances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities, vol. 17, pp. 1-28. https://doi.org/10.1016/S0735-004X(04)17001-8

EFFICACY OF BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES WITH ADOLESCENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES AND BEHAVIOR DISORDERS. / Hughes, Charles A.; Therrien, William J.; Lee, David.

Research in Secondary Schools. 2004. p. 1-28 (Advances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities; Vol. 17).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

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AB - This chapter presents a quantitative and qualitative review of research on the use of behavioral self-management (BSM) procedures with adolescents with learning disabilities or behavioral disorders (LD/BD). These procedures included self-monitoring, self-evaluation, self-reinforcement, self-instruction, and packages containing two or more BSM techniques. Twenty studies published from 1981 to 2002 were identified and analyzed. The analysis centered on a series of questions addressing overall effectiveness of the procedures, whether BSM produced socially valid changes, where the changes occurred (i.e. special education or general education setting), whether maintenance and generalization of the target behavior(s) occurred, and if students began to use BSM procedures on their own. Results showed a mean percentage of nonoverlapping data (PND) of 80 indicating that BSM procedures are, overall, an effective approach to behavior change. It also appears that in some instances, these changes are socially valid in that the performance of students with LD/BD can be improved to the level of nondisabled peers. Interventions consisting of a combination of self-management procedures appear to be the most effective, however self-monitoring alone has similar impact. BSM also appears to be effective with a wide variety of behaviors, albeit with relatively discrete behaviors (versus more complex chains of behaviors used in strategic problem-solving). While there is some evidence that target behaviors were generalized and maintained, many of the studies reviewed did not measure it. Also of concern was the apparent lack of student involvement in selecting target behaviors, goal setting, forms of recording etc as well as the fact that no study measured student ability to apply BSM procedures after intervention. Implications for future research and practice are discussed.

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Hughes CA, Therrien WJ, Lee D. EFFICACY OF BEHAVIORAL SELF-MANAGEMENT TECHNIQUES WITH ADOLESCENTS WITH LEARNING DISABILITIES AND BEHAVIOR DISORDERS. In Research in Secondary Schools. 2004. p. 1-28. (Advances in Learning and Behavioral Disabilities). https://doi.org/10.1016/S0735-004X(04)17001-8