Electrochemical sensors for gas pipelines using ion conducting membranes

J. Beck, M. Ziomek-Moroz, Serguei Lvov

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Electrochemical sensors can be used for a wide range of online in-situ process monitoring applications. However, the lack of a consistent electrolyte layer has limited electrochemical monitoring in gas and supercritical fluid streams. A solid state sensor is being designed that uses an ion conducting membrane to perform conductivity and corrosion measurements in natural gas pipelines up to 1000 psi. Initial results show that membrane conductivity measurements can be correlated directly to water content down to dew points of 1 °C with good linearity. Corrosion monitoring can also be performed using methods such as linear polarization resistance and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), though care must be taken in the electrode design to minimize deviation between sensors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationMaterials for Energy, Efficiency and Sustainability - TechConnect Briefs 2017
EditorsBart Romanowicz, Fiona Case, Matthew Laudon, Fiona Case
PublisherTechConnect
Pages160-163
Number of pages4
ISBN (Electronic)9780997511796
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
Event11th Annual TechConnect World Innovation Conference and Expo, Held Jointly with the 20th Annual Nanotech Conference and Expo, and the 2017 National SBIR/STTR Conference - Washington, United States
Duration: May 14 2017May 17 2017

Publication series

NameAdvanced Materials - TechConnect Briefs 2017
Volume2

Other

Other11th Annual TechConnect World Innovation Conference and Expo, Held Jointly with the 20th Annual Nanotech Conference and Expo, and the 2017 National SBIR/STTR Conference
CountryUnited States
CityWashington
Period5/14/175/17/17

Fingerprint

Electrochemical sensors
Corrosion
Gas pipelines
Gases
Ions
Natural Gas
Solid-state sensors
Dielectric Spectroscopy
Membranes
Natural gas pipelines
Supercritical fluids
Monitoring
Process monitoring
Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
Water content
Electrolytes
Electrodes
Polarization
Water
Sensors

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Fuel Technology
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Biotechnology
  • Fluid Flow and Transfer Processes

Cite this

Beck, J., Ziomek-Moroz, M., & Lvov, S. (2017). Electrochemical sensors for gas pipelines using ion conducting membranes. In B. Romanowicz, F. Case, M. Laudon, & F. Case (Eds.), Materials for Energy, Efficiency and Sustainability - TechConnect Briefs 2017 (pp. 160-163). (Advanced Materials - TechConnect Briefs 2017; Vol. 2). TechConnect.
Beck, J. ; Ziomek-Moroz, M. ; Lvov, Serguei. / Electrochemical sensors for gas pipelines using ion conducting membranes. Materials for Energy, Efficiency and Sustainability - TechConnect Briefs 2017. editor / Bart Romanowicz ; Fiona Case ; Matthew Laudon ; Fiona Case. TechConnect, 2017. pp. 160-163 (Advanced Materials - TechConnect Briefs 2017).
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Beck, J, Ziomek-Moroz, M & Lvov, S 2017, Electrochemical sensors for gas pipelines using ion conducting membranes. in B Romanowicz, F Case, M Laudon & F Case (eds), Materials for Energy, Efficiency and Sustainability - TechConnect Briefs 2017. Advanced Materials - TechConnect Briefs 2017, vol. 2, TechConnect, pp. 160-163, 11th Annual TechConnect World Innovation Conference and Expo, Held Jointly with the 20th Annual Nanotech Conference and Expo, and the 2017 National SBIR/STTR Conference, Washington, United States, 5/14/17.

Electrochemical sensors for gas pipelines using ion conducting membranes. / Beck, J.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Lvov, Serguei.

Materials for Energy, Efficiency and Sustainability - TechConnect Briefs 2017. ed. / Bart Romanowicz; Fiona Case; Matthew Laudon; Fiona Case. TechConnect, 2017. p. 160-163 (Advanced Materials - TechConnect Briefs 2017; Vol. 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Beck J, Ziomek-Moroz M, Lvov S. Electrochemical sensors for gas pipelines using ion conducting membranes. In Romanowicz B, Case F, Laudon M, Case F, editors, Materials for Energy, Efficiency and Sustainability - TechConnect Briefs 2017. TechConnect. 2017. p. 160-163. (Advanced Materials - TechConnect Briefs 2017).