Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells

Claudia Rojas, Ignacio T. Vargas, Mary Ann Bruns, John M. Regan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The limited database of acidophilic or acidotolerant electrochemically active microorganisms prevents advancements on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated under low pH. In this study, three MFCs were used to enrich cathodic biofilms using acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments as inoculum. Linear sweep voltammetry showed cathodic current plateaus of 5.5 (± 0.7) mA at about − 170 mV vs Ag/AgCl and 8.5 (± 0.9) mA between − 500 mV to − 450 mV vs Ag/AgCl for biofilms developed on small graphite fiber brushes. After gamma irradiation, biocathodes exhibited a decrease in current density approaching that of abiotic controls. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed six-fold lower charge transfer resistance with viable biofilm. Pyrosequencing data showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the biofilms. Acidithiobacillus representatives were enriched in some biocathodes, supporting the potential importance of these known iron and sulfur oxidizers as cathodic biocatalysts. Other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs identified included Sulfobacillus and Leptospirillum species. The presence of chemoautotrophs was consistent with functional capabilities predicted by PICRUSt related to carbon fixation pathways in prokaryotic microorganisms. Acidophilic or acidotolerant heterotrophs were also abundant; however, their contribution to cathodic performance is unknown. This study directs subsequent research efforts to particular groups of AMD-associated bacteria that are electrochemically active on cathodes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)139-146
Number of pages8
JournalBioelectrochemistry
Volume118
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2017

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Bioelectric Energy Sources
Microbial fuel cells
biofilms
Biofilms
microorganisms
drainage
Microorganisms
Drainage
fuel cells
Electrodes
Cathodes
cathodes
Oxidation
oxidation
acids
Acids
heterotrophs
Acidithiobacillus
inoculum
Dielectric Spectroscopy

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry
  • Electrochemistry

Cite this

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title = "Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells",
abstract = "The limited database of acidophilic or acidotolerant electrochemically active microorganisms prevents advancements on microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operated under low pH. In this study, three MFCs were used to enrich cathodic biofilms using acid mine drainage (AMD) sediments as inoculum. Linear sweep voltammetry showed cathodic current plateaus of 5.5 (± 0.7) mA at about − 170 mV vs Ag/AgCl and 8.5 (± 0.9) mA between − 500 mV to − 450 mV vs Ag/AgCl for biofilms developed on small graphite fiber brushes. After gamma irradiation, biocathodes exhibited a decrease in current density approaching that of abiotic controls. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy showed six-fold lower charge transfer resistance with viable biofilm. Pyrosequencing data showed that Proteobacteria and Firmicutes dominated the biofilms. Acidithiobacillus representatives were enriched in some biocathodes, supporting the potential importance of these known iron and sulfur oxidizers as cathodic biocatalysts. Other acidophilic chemolithoautotrophs identified included Sulfobacillus and Leptospirillum species. The presence of chemoautotrophs was consistent with functional capabilities predicted by PICRUSt related to carbon fixation pathways in prokaryotic microorganisms. Acidophilic or acidotolerant heterotrophs were also abundant; however, their contribution to cathodic performance is unknown. This study directs subsequent research efforts to particular groups of AMD-associated bacteria that are electrochemically active on cathodes.",
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Electrochemically active microorganisms from an acid mine drainage-affected site promote cathode oxidation in microbial fuel cells. / Rojas, Claudia; Vargas, Ignacio T.; Bruns, Mary Ann; Regan, John M.

In: Bioelectrochemistry, Vol. 118, 12.2017, p. 139-146.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Vargas, Ignacio T.

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