Electrochemistry in nanostructured inorganic molecular materials

Mary Elizabeth Williams, Joseph T. Hupp

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

We have previously described the synthesis of a family of molecular 'squares' based on octahedral Re(I) coordination of difunctional bridging ligands. The size and chemical composition of the square cavity is highly tunable, and the inorganic cyclophanes are being actively studied in catalytic, separations, and sensing applications. Electrochemical techniques have been primary methods for characterization of the transport properties of thin films of the nanostructured materials. For example, cyclic voltammetry and rotating disk electrode voltammetry experiments have revealed size-selective permeation by redox probes, where the size cutoff is determined by the internal square dimensions. We have more recently begun to employ scanning electrochemical microscopy to spatially image micropatterned electrodes containing these thin film materials, simultaneously allowing us to obtain permeability data and topographical information. This paper describes data obtained by employing porphyrin-based molecular squares that feature chemically tailored cavities.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalMaterials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings
Volume676
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
EventSynthesis, Functional Properties and Applications of Nanostructures - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Apr 17 2001Apr 20 2001

Fingerprint

Electrochemistry
electrochemistry
Thin films
Electrodes
Porphyrins
Rotating disks
Voltammetry
Nanostructured materials
Permeation
Transport properties
Cyclic voltammetry
Microscopic examination
cavities
electrodes
Ligands
rotating disks
thin films
Scanning
porphyrins
permeability

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

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Electrochemistry in nanostructured inorganic molecular materials. / Williams, Mary Elizabeth; Hupp, Joseph T.

In: Materials Research Society Symposium - Proceedings, Vol. 676, 01.12.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

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AU - Hupp, Joseph T.

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