Electronic Health Information Exchange Opportunities for Self-management of Care: Responses from Older Adults With and Without Cancer History in the United States

Shirley Bluethmann, Kisha I. Coa, Catherine M. Alfano, Bradford W. Hesse

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose of Study: Of 15.5 million US cancer survivors, 80% are ≥ 55 years. Supporting older patients in care self-management through electronic health information (EHI) exchange may enhance recovery. We assessed: (1) perceived importance of EHI access to adults ≥ 55 years (incl survivors) and (2) age-related preferences for EHI exchange. Recent Findings: Older adults are one of the fastest-growing user groups for internet/technologies. Most older adults 55–64 years are active internet users, and use among adults ≥ 65 years is growing quickly as baby boomers mature. Understanding EHI patient-provider exchange preferences may provide opportunities for older patients but also begin to address the future needs of other patient populations, including cancer survivors. Summary: We observed a “digital divide” for perceived importance of EHI access and EHI exchange interests. Engaging older adults (i.e., ≥ 75 years) to improve comfort/experience with technologies may support EHI use in self-management. Survivors may have distinct EHI needs/preferences than older adults without cancer history.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number30
JournalCurrent oncology reports
Volume20
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2018

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Self Care
Survivors
Health
Neoplasms
Internet
Technology
Access to Information
Patient Care
Health Information Exchange
Population

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Oncology

Cite this

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title = "Electronic Health Information Exchange Opportunities for Self-management of Care: Responses from Older Adults With and Without Cancer History in the United States",
abstract = "Purpose of Study: Of 15.5 million US cancer survivors, 80{\%} are ≥ 55 years. Supporting older patients in care self-management through electronic health information (EHI) exchange may enhance recovery. We assessed: (1) perceived importance of EHI access to adults ≥ 55 years (incl survivors) and (2) age-related preferences for EHI exchange. Recent Findings: Older adults are one of the fastest-growing user groups for internet/technologies. Most older adults 55–64 years are active internet users, and use among adults ≥ 65 years is growing quickly as baby boomers mature. Understanding EHI patient-provider exchange preferences may provide opportunities for older patients but also begin to address the future needs of other patient populations, including cancer survivors. Summary: We observed a “digital divide” for perceived importance of EHI access and EHI exchange interests. Engaging older adults (i.e., ≥ 75 years) to improve comfort/experience with technologies may support EHI use in self-management. Survivors may have distinct EHI needs/preferences than older adults without cancer history.",
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Electronic Health Information Exchange Opportunities for Self-management of Care : Responses from Older Adults With and Without Cancer History in the United States. / Bluethmann, Shirley; Coa, Kisha I.; Alfano, Catherine M.; Hesse, Bradford W.

In: Current oncology reports, Vol. 20, No. 4, 30, 01.04.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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AU - Coa, Kisha I.

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AU - Hesse, Bradford W.

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N2 - Purpose of Study: Of 15.5 million US cancer survivors, 80% are ≥ 55 years. Supporting older patients in care self-management through electronic health information (EHI) exchange may enhance recovery. We assessed: (1) perceived importance of EHI access to adults ≥ 55 years (incl survivors) and (2) age-related preferences for EHI exchange. Recent Findings: Older adults are one of the fastest-growing user groups for internet/technologies. Most older adults 55–64 years are active internet users, and use among adults ≥ 65 years is growing quickly as baby boomers mature. Understanding EHI patient-provider exchange preferences may provide opportunities for older patients but also begin to address the future needs of other patient populations, including cancer survivors. Summary: We observed a “digital divide” for perceived importance of EHI access and EHI exchange interests. Engaging older adults (i.e., ≥ 75 years) to improve comfort/experience with technologies may support EHI use in self-management. Survivors may have distinct EHI needs/preferences than older adults without cancer history.

AB - Purpose of Study: Of 15.5 million US cancer survivors, 80% are ≥ 55 years. Supporting older patients in care self-management through electronic health information (EHI) exchange may enhance recovery. We assessed: (1) perceived importance of EHI access to adults ≥ 55 years (incl survivors) and (2) age-related preferences for EHI exchange. Recent Findings: Older adults are one of the fastest-growing user groups for internet/technologies. Most older adults 55–64 years are active internet users, and use among adults ≥ 65 years is growing quickly as baby boomers mature. Understanding EHI patient-provider exchange preferences may provide opportunities for older patients but also begin to address the future needs of other patient populations, including cancer survivors. Summary: We observed a “digital divide” for perceived importance of EHI access and EHI exchange interests. Engaging older adults (i.e., ≥ 75 years) to improve comfort/experience with technologies may support EHI use in self-management. Survivors may have distinct EHI needs/preferences than older adults without cancer history.

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