Electrophoretic transfer of proteins from fixed and stained gels

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A procedure by which sodium dodecyl sulfate gels can be fixed and stained with Coomassie blue and subsequently transferred to nitrocellulose for immunostaining is outlined. The procedure involves the complete removal of the stain followed by equilibration of the gel in sodium dodecyl sulfate running buffer. The efficiency of transfer is comparable to unfixed gels and the protein pattern of the transfer appears to be sharper, presumably due to less diffusion during the transfer process. The procedure does not affect the antigenicity of the proteins that have been examined by subsequent immunostaining. This method is particularly useful for situations in which sample size or concentration are limiting factors resulting in insufficient material for duplicate gels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-412
Number of pages4
JournalAnalytical Biochemistry
Volume141
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1984

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Gels
Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate
Proteins
Collodion
Sample Size
Buffers
Coloring Agents

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biophysics
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

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abstract = "A procedure by which sodium dodecyl sulfate gels can be fixed and stained with Coomassie blue and subsequently transferred to nitrocellulose for immunostaining is outlined. The procedure involves the complete removal of the stain followed by equilibration of the gel in sodium dodecyl sulfate running buffer. The efficiency of transfer is comparable to unfixed gels and the protein pattern of the transfer appears to be sharper, presumably due to less diffusion during the transfer process. The procedure does not affect the antigenicity of the proteins that have been examined by subsequent immunostaining. This method is particularly useful for situations in which sample size or concentration are limiting factors resulting in insufficient material for duplicate gels.",
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Electrophoretic transfer of proteins from fixed and stained gels. / Phelps, David.

In: Analytical Biochemistry, Vol. 141, No. 2, 01.01.1984, p. 409-412.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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