Electrospun nanofiber mats from aqueous starch-pullulan dispersions: Optimizing dispersion properties for electrospinning

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

A green method to fabricate starch-based nanofibers is provided. High-temperature (≈162 °C) was used to destructure high-amylose starch in water. Sodium palmitate was added to enhance the stability of high-amylose starch in water at room temperature and increase the conductivity of the electrospinning dope. Flow properties and zeta potential of starch-palmitate dispersions were characterized by rheometer and dynamic light scattering, respectively. Pullulan was mixed in as a minor component of the starch-palmitate complex (starch:pullulan at a ca. 2:1 ratio) and the mixture electrospun. Pullulan hindered starch association and modified the dispersion properties, promoting molecular entanglement without gelation. The presence of sodium palmitate-starch inclusion complexes in the fiber was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Tensile strength of the nanofiber composite was found to be weaker than that of micro-sized pure starch fiber mats. This method provides future industry with lower cost by eliminating the use of organic chemicals.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1168-1174
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Biological Macromolecules
Volume133
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 15 2019

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Nanofibers
Electrospinning
Starch
Dispersions
Amylose
Palmitic Acid
Palmitates
Sodium
Organic Chemicals
pullulan
Temperature
Water
Fibers
Tensile Strength
Rheometers
Organic chemicals
Differential Scanning Calorimetry
Dynamic light scattering
Gelation
Zeta potential

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Structural Biology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Economics and Econometrics
  • Energy(all)

Cite this

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title = "Electrospun nanofiber mats from aqueous starch-pullulan dispersions: Optimizing dispersion properties for electrospinning",
abstract = "A green method to fabricate starch-based nanofibers is provided. High-temperature (≈162 °C) was used to destructure high-amylose starch in water. Sodium palmitate was added to enhance the stability of high-amylose starch in water at room temperature and increase the conductivity of the electrospinning dope. Flow properties and zeta potential of starch-palmitate dispersions were characterized by rheometer and dynamic light scattering, respectively. Pullulan was mixed in as a minor component of the starch-palmitate complex (starch:pullulan at a ca. 2:1 ratio) and the mixture electrospun. Pullulan hindered starch association and modified the dispersion properties, promoting molecular entanglement without gelation. The presence of sodium palmitate-starch inclusion complexes in the fiber was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Tensile strength of the nanofiber composite was found to be weaker than that of micro-sized pure starch fiber mats. This method provides future industry with lower cost by eliminating the use of organic chemicals.",
author = "Hui Wang and Ziegler, {Gregory Ray}",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2019.04.199",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "133",
pages = "1168--1174",
journal = "International Journal of Biological Macromolecules",
issn = "0141-8130",
publisher = "Elsevier",

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T2 - Optimizing dispersion properties for electrospinning

AU - Wang, Hui

AU - Ziegler, Gregory Ray

PY - 2019/7/15

Y1 - 2019/7/15

N2 - A green method to fabricate starch-based nanofibers is provided. High-temperature (≈162 °C) was used to destructure high-amylose starch in water. Sodium palmitate was added to enhance the stability of high-amylose starch in water at room temperature and increase the conductivity of the electrospinning dope. Flow properties and zeta potential of starch-palmitate dispersions were characterized by rheometer and dynamic light scattering, respectively. Pullulan was mixed in as a minor component of the starch-palmitate complex (starch:pullulan at a ca. 2:1 ratio) and the mixture electrospun. Pullulan hindered starch association and modified the dispersion properties, promoting molecular entanglement without gelation. The presence of sodium palmitate-starch inclusion complexes in the fiber was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Tensile strength of the nanofiber composite was found to be weaker than that of micro-sized pure starch fiber mats. This method provides future industry with lower cost by eliminating the use of organic chemicals.

AB - A green method to fabricate starch-based nanofibers is provided. High-temperature (≈162 °C) was used to destructure high-amylose starch in water. Sodium palmitate was added to enhance the stability of high-amylose starch in water at room temperature and increase the conductivity of the electrospinning dope. Flow properties and zeta potential of starch-palmitate dispersions were characterized by rheometer and dynamic light scattering, respectively. Pullulan was mixed in as a minor component of the starch-palmitate complex (starch:pullulan at a ca. 2:1 ratio) and the mixture electrospun. Pullulan hindered starch association and modified the dispersion properties, promoting molecular entanglement without gelation. The presence of sodium palmitate-starch inclusion complexes in the fiber was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Tensile strength of the nanofiber composite was found to be weaker than that of micro-sized pure starch fiber mats. This method provides future industry with lower cost by eliminating the use of organic chemicals.

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