Elementary and secondary socially and/or emotionally disturbed girls. Characteristics and identification

Richard Mattison, Jeanette Morales, Marc A. Bauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Extensive characteristics were studied for girls in elementary and secondary public schools who were recommended for classes for the socially and/or emotionally disturbed. In general, these girls were of normal intelligence, demonstrated a wide range of DSNI-III psychiatric disorders, and had experienced limited intervention through the school and community. Multiple family stressors, especially abuse, were significantly more common in SED girls than in girls evaluated for SED placement but recommended for other educational intervention. Also, significantly more severe global dysfunction was reported by SED girls according to standardized teacher, parent, and clinician instruments. Suggestions for prevention, treatment, and identification of SED girls are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-134
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of School Psychology
Volume29
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

Fingerprint

Intelligence
school
Psychiatry
Identification (Psychology)
intelligence
parents
abuse
teacher
community
Therapeutics

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

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Elementary and secondary socially and/or emotionally disturbed girls. Characteristics and identification. / Mattison, Richard; Morales, Jeanette; Bauer, Marc A.

In: Journal of School Psychology, Vol. 29, No. 2, 01.01.1991, p. 121-134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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