Embassies for sale: The purchase of Diplomatic recognition by West Germany, Taiwan and South Korea

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article examines the efforts of three relatively wealthy countries to win diplomatic recognition by using economic aid. West Germany, South Korea, and Taiwan all have utilized this method of “purchasing” recognition. Until 1969, West Germany used economic aid to support the so-called Hallstein Doctrine, which demanded that other countries deny diplomatic recognition to East Germany. Both South Korea and Taiwan continue today to use their wealth to induce other states to recognize them and not their Communist counterparts, North Korea and the People’s Republic of China. These three case studies help to demonstrate the importance of positive economic linkage in international affairs, even in very militarized and ideologically polarized situations. If countries are willing to “sell” diplomatic recognition, one of the most basic attributes of state sovereignty in the Westphalian model, then the potential power of this type of economic leverage becomes clear.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)259-283
Number of pages25
JournalInternational Politics
Volume37
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Political Science and International Relations

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Embassies for sale: The purchase of Diplomatic recognition by West Germany, Taiwan and South Korea'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this