Emergent flesh

Phusiopoiesis and Ancient Arts of Training

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines connections between ancient training of the mind and body to delineate a concept of phusiopoiesis, the production of one's nature. The category of nature (phusis) for the presocratics and sophists operates not as an essential and unchangeable state, but rather as a malleable disposition, one that can be altered through a process of production (poiesis). Such a configuration of phusis in pre-Socratic fragments, Hippocratic treatises, and philosophical discussions of the body, medicine, and training holds implications for ancient training practices, most especially challenging assumptions about the category of natural talent thought to be necessary for success as a rhetor or athlete. This bodily transformation entails at least three dynamics of phusiopoietic training: friendship, masochism, and erotics.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)141-157
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Sport & Social Issues
Volume25
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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art
athlete
friendship
disposition
medicine

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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Emergent flesh : Phusiopoiesis and Ancient Arts of Training. / Hawhee, Debra.

In: Journal of Sport & Social Issues, Vol. 25, No. 2, 01.01.2001, p. 141-157.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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