EMG discharge patterns during human grip movement are task-dependent and not modulated by muscle contraction modes: A transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study

J. G. Anson, Y. Hasegawa, T. Kasai, M. L. Latash, S. Yahagi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our previous study revealed that, during tonic muscle contraction, remarkable functional differences among intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were observed during two different grip movements, i.e., precision and power grips. To verify whether this evidence is true even under the phasic muscle contraction, magnetic stimulation was delivered over the left scalp while a normal human subject performed phasic precision or power grip responses of the right-hand fingers in a simple reaction time (SRT) paradigm. Magnetic stimulation delivered during the latent period revealed different cortico-motoneuronal excitations between the two grip responses. In particular, the contributions of extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle were definitely different between the two grip responses, although motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of first dorsal interosseous (FDI) prior to, and after EMG onset of movement initiation, were not different. These results were similar to previous results obtained during tonic muscle contraction. Thus, we have concluded that the task-dependent EMG discharge pattern in finger manipulation could not be modulated by muscle contraction modes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-166
Number of pages5
JournalBrain research
Volume934
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 3 2002

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Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Hand Strength
Muscle Contraction
Fingers
Motor Evoked Potentials
Muscles
Scalp
Reaction Time
Hand
Power (Psychology)

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

Cite this

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abstract = "Our previous study revealed that, during tonic muscle contraction, remarkable functional differences among intrinsic and extrinsic muscles were observed during two different grip movements, i.e., precision and power grips. To verify whether this evidence is true even under the phasic muscle contraction, magnetic stimulation was delivered over the left scalp while a normal human subject performed phasic precision or power grip responses of the right-hand fingers in a simple reaction time (SRT) paradigm. Magnetic stimulation delivered during the latent period revealed different cortico-motoneuronal excitations between the two grip responses. In particular, the contributions of extensor carpi radialis (ECR) muscle were definitely different between the two grip responses, although motor-evoked potentials (MEPs) of first dorsal interosseous (FDI) prior to, and after EMG onset of movement initiation, were not different. These results were similar to previous results obtained during tonic muscle contraction. Thus, we have concluded that the task-dependent EMG discharge pattern in finger manipulation could not be modulated by muscle contraction modes.",
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EMG discharge patterns during human grip movement are task-dependent and not modulated by muscle contraction modes : A transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) study. / Anson, J. G.; Hasegawa, Y.; Kasai, T.; Latash, M. L.; Yahagi, S.

In: Brain research, Vol. 934, No. 2, 03.05.2002, p. 162-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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