Emotion recognition in preschool children: Associations with maternal depression and early parenting

Autumn Kujawa, Lea Dougherty, C. Emily Durbin, Rebecca Laptook, Dana Torpey, Daniel N. Klein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Emotion knowledge in childhood has been shown to predict social functioning and psychological well-being, but relatively little is known about parental factors that influence its development in early childhood. There is some evidence that both parenting behavior and maternal depression are associated with emotion recognition, but previous research has only examined these factors independently. The current study assessed auditory and visual emotion recognition ability among a large sample of preschool children to examine typical emotion recognition skills in children of this age, as well as the independent and interactive effects of maternal and paternal depression and negative parenting (i.e., hostility and intrusiveness). Results indicated that children were most accurate at identifying happy emotional expressions. The lowest accuracy was observed for neutral expressions. A significant interaction was found between maternal depression and negative parenting behavior: children with a maternal history of depression were particularly sensitive to the negative effects of maladaptive parenting behavior on emotion recognition ability. No significant effects were found for paternal depression. These results highlight the importance of examining the effects of multiple interacting factors on children's emotional development and provide suggestions for identifying children for targeted preventive interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)159-170
Number of pages12
JournalDevelopment and Psychopathology
Volume26
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Parenting
Preschool Children
Emotions
Mothers
Depression
Aptitude
Maternal Behavior
Hostility
Child Behavior
Child Development
Psychology
Research

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Kujawa, Autumn ; Dougherty, Lea ; Durbin, C. Emily ; Laptook, Rebecca ; Torpey, Dana ; Klein, Daniel N. / Emotion recognition in preschool children : Associations with maternal depression and early parenting. In: Development and Psychopathology. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 1. pp. 159-170.
@article{48aaccfa3cbb4cb582ff7917a0fc03d5,
title = "Emotion recognition in preschool children: Associations with maternal depression and early parenting",
abstract = "Emotion knowledge in childhood has been shown to predict social functioning and psychological well-being, but relatively little is known about parental factors that influence its development in early childhood. There is some evidence that both parenting behavior and maternal depression are associated with emotion recognition, but previous research has only examined these factors independently. The current study assessed auditory and visual emotion recognition ability among a large sample of preschool children to examine typical emotion recognition skills in children of this age, as well as the independent and interactive effects of maternal and paternal depression and negative parenting (i.e., hostility and intrusiveness). Results indicated that children were most accurate at identifying happy emotional expressions. The lowest accuracy was observed for neutral expressions. A significant interaction was found between maternal depression and negative parenting behavior: children with a maternal history of depression were particularly sensitive to the negative effects of maladaptive parenting behavior on emotion recognition ability. No significant effects were found for paternal depression. These results highlight the importance of examining the effects of multiple interacting factors on children's emotional development and provide suggestions for identifying children for targeted preventive interventions.",
author = "Autumn Kujawa and Lea Dougherty and Durbin, {C. Emily} and Rebecca Laptook and Dana Torpey and Klein, {Daniel N.}",
year = "2014",
month = "2",
doi = "10.1017/S0954579413000928",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "26",
pages = "159--170",
journal = "Development and Psychopathology",
issn = "0954-5794",
publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
number = "1",

}

Emotion recognition in preschool children : Associations with maternal depression and early parenting. / Kujawa, Autumn; Dougherty, Lea; Durbin, C. Emily; Laptook, Rebecca; Torpey, Dana; Klein, Daniel N.

In: Development and Psychopathology, Vol. 26, No. 1, 02.2014, p. 159-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Emotion recognition in preschool children

T2 - Associations with maternal depression and early parenting

AU - Kujawa, Autumn

AU - Dougherty, Lea

AU - Durbin, C. Emily

AU - Laptook, Rebecca

AU - Torpey, Dana

AU - Klein, Daniel N.

PY - 2014/2

Y1 - 2014/2

N2 - Emotion knowledge in childhood has been shown to predict social functioning and psychological well-being, but relatively little is known about parental factors that influence its development in early childhood. There is some evidence that both parenting behavior and maternal depression are associated with emotion recognition, but previous research has only examined these factors independently. The current study assessed auditory and visual emotion recognition ability among a large sample of preschool children to examine typical emotion recognition skills in children of this age, as well as the independent and interactive effects of maternal and paternal depression and negative parenting (i.e., hostility and intrusiveness). Results indicated that children were most accurate at identifying happy emotional expressions. The lowest accuracy was observed for neutral expressions. A significant interaction was found between maternal depression and negative parenting behavior: children with a maternal history of depression were particularly sensitive to the negative effects of maladaptive parenting behavior on emotion recognition ability. No significant effects were found for paternal depression. These results highlight the importance of examining the effects of multiple interacting factors on children's emotional development and provide suggestions for identifying children for targeted preventive interventions.

AB - Emotion knowledge in childhood has been shown to predict social functioning and psychological well-being, but relatively little is known about parental factors that influence its development in early childhood. There is some evidence that both parenting behavior and maternal depression are associated with emotion recognition, but previous research has only examined these factors independently. The current study assessed auditory and visual emotion recognition ability among a large sample of preschool children to examine typical emotion recognition skills in children of this age, as well as the independent and interactive effects of maternal and paternal depression and negative parenting (i.e., hostility and intrusiveness). Results indicated that children were most accurate at identifying happy emotional expressions. The lowest accuracy was observed for neutral expressions. A significant interaction was found between maternal depression and negative parenting behavior: children with a maternal history of depression were particularly sensitive to the negative effects of maladaptive parenting behavior on emotion recognition ability. No significant effects were found for paternal depression. These results highlight the importance of examining the effects of multiple interacting factors on children's emotional development and provide suggestions for identifying children for targeted preventive interventions.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84896446712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84896446712&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1017/S0954579413000928

DO - 10.1017/S0954579413000928

M3 - Article

C2 - 24444174

AN - SCOPUS:84896446712

VL - 26

SP - 159

EP - 170

JO - Development and Psychopathology

JF - Development and Psychopathology

SN - 0954-5794

IS - 1

ER -