Employee voice viewed through a cross-cultural lens

Bora Kwon, Elaine Farndale

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Employee voice may have positive outcomes for organizations, however, encouraging employees to speak out is not guaranteed unless the organization signals that it is safe and effective for employees to do so. In this conceptual paper, we identify core variables that constitute the norms for voice created in organizations across national cultures. Developing a multilevel conceptual framework of employee voice, we explore how organizational norms related to different voice channels provide signals to employees about voice consequences, namely voice safety and effectiveness. Given organizations do not operate in contextual vacuums, we also apply a macro-level consideration of national culture values that influence organizational voice norms to affect safety and effectiveness signals. A conceptual framework and propositions for future research are presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalHuman Resource Management Review
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

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Lenses
Safety
Vacuum
Employee voice
Conceptual framework
Employees
National cultures

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Applied Psychology
  • Organizational Behavior and Human Resource Management

Cite this

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Employee voice viewed through a cross-cultural lens. / Kwon, Bora; Farndale, Elaine.

In: Human Resource Management Review, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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