Encoding of Instruments When 10- to 14-Year-Olds Process Isolated Instrument-Implicit Sentences: More Evidence of Improved Encoding During Childhood Resulting From Elaborative Instructions

Peggy Noel Van Meter, Michael Pressley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

7 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether 10- to 14-year-olds infer implied instruments when reading isolated instrument-implicit sentences (IIS; e.g., Her friend swept the floor) as certainly and completely as they do when instructed to generate instruments in response to IIS. On-line instrumental encoding was tested with a procedure that was based on recognition priming of instrument words given some of the letters from the words (i.e., a word fragment). When children read the IIS without instruction to infer the implied instruments, the instrument fragment completion rates were low and less than when inference generation was required or instruments were stated during reading. Children's spontaneous instrumental inferences are less certain than suggested in previous research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)402-412
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume86
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

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