Encouraging Volunteering in Nonprofit Organizations: The Role of Organizational Inclusion and Volunteer Need Satisfaction

Yan Huang, Denise Sevick Bortree, Fan Yang, Ruoxu Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using self-determination theory as a framework, this study examined the relationship between perceived organizational inclusion, volunteer need satisfaction, and future behavioral intentions. A national survey of 428 volunteers found that when volunteers feel more included in the workplace, they experience higher need satisfaction, which leads to greater behavioral intentions toward the organization. Additionally, a path analysis found that some of the personal dimensions of inclusion (i.e., decision-making, information networks, and participation) predicted volunteer need satisfaction (i.e., competence, relatedness, and autonomy). All dimensions of need satisfaction predicted future behavioral intentions. There was a significant indirect effect of volunteering inclusion on behavioral intentions through need satisfaction. Results suggest that nonprofit organizations should encourage need satisfaction of their volunteers, and this can be accomplished in part through creating an inclusive environment. Other important theoretical and practical implications are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-165
Number of pages19
JournalJournal of Nonprofit and Public Sector Marketing
Volume32
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 14 2020

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Marketing

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