Endogenous and exogenous factors affecting periodicities of female calling and male sex pheromone response in Grapholitha molesta (Busck)

Thomas Charles Baker, Ring T. Cardé

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

115 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In Grapholitha molesta periodicities of both female calling and male response to sex pheromone by wing fanning while walking were determined in part by circadian rhythms. The lights-on photoperiodic cue was at least partly responsible for setting the phase of the female calling rhythm. Absolute temperature levels and not necessarily a decrease in temperature modified the timing of calling; there were both high and low thresholds of temperature and, at particular photoperiod times, a temperature range optimal for calling. When the previous performance of calling was prevented by subthreshold temperatures, calling during the next period commenced earlier if temperatures were favourable. Thus, the previous performance of calling may establish a refractory period, or temperature decrease may act as a cue resetting the phase of the calling rhythm. The ability to use both an endogenous clock and exogenous temperature cues to synchronize sexual activity appears adaptive for a temperate zone insect whose multiple generations are exposed to both long periods of favourable climatic conditions in summer and harsh, unpredictable conditions in spring or fall.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)943-950
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Insect Physiology
Volume25
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1979

Fingerprint

Grapholita molesta
Sex Attractants
Periodicity
sex pheromones
periodicity
Temperature
temperature
Cues
wing fanning
Aptitude
Photoperiod
Circadian Rhythm
temperate zones
Sexual Behavior
walking
circadian rhythm
Walking
Insects
photoperiod
Light

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

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abstract = "In Grapholitha molesta periodicities of both female calling and male response to sex pheromone by wing fanning while walking were determined in part by circadian rhythms. The lights-on photoperiodic cue was at least partly responsible for setting the phase of the female calling rhythm. Absolute temperature levels and not necessarily a decrease in temperature modified the timing of calling; there were both high and low thresholds of temperature and, at particular photoperiod times, a temperature range optimal for calling. When the previous performance of calling was prevented by subthreshold temperatures, calling during the next period commenced earlier if temperatures were favourable. Thus, the previous performance of calling may establish a refractory period, or temperature decrease may act as a cue resetting the phase of the calling rhythm. The ability to use both an endogenous clock and exogenous temperature cues to synchronize sexual activity appears adaptive for a temperate zone insect whose multiple generations are exposed to both long periods of favourable climatic conditions in summer and harsh, unpredictable conditions in spring or fall.",
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N2 - In Grapholitha molesta periodicities of both female calling and male response to sex pheromone by wing fanning while walking were determined in part by circadian rhythms. The lights-on photoperiodic cue was at least partly responsible for setting the phase of the female calling rhythm. Absolute temperature levels and not necessarily a decrease in temperature modified the timing of calling; there were both high and low thresholds of temperature and, at particular photoperiod times, a temperature range optimal for calling. When the previous performance of calling was prevented by subthreshold temperatures, calling during the next period commenced earlier if temperatures were favourable. Thus, the previous performance of calling may establish a refractory period, or temperature decrease may act as a cue resetting the phase of the calling rhythm. The ability to use both an endogenous clock and exogenous temperature cues to synchronize sexual activity appears adaptive for a temperate zone insect whose multiple generations are exposed to both long periods of favourable climatic conditions in summer and harsh, unpredictable conditions in spring or fall.

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