Endophthalmitis caused by moraxella species

Audina M. Berrocal, Ingrid Scott, Darlene Miller, Harry W. Flynn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

27 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE: To report the incidence, clinical presentation, antibiotic sensitivities, and treatment outcomes for endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species. METHODS: Consecutive interventional case series. Medical records were reviewed of all patients treated at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between 1991 and 2000 for endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species. RESULTS: Moraxella species were recovered from 9 patients (10 eyes), or 1.3% (10 of 757) of all culture-proven bacterial endophthalmitis cases; Moraxella catarrhalis was recovered from 7 eyes and Moraxella osloensis from 3. Endophthalmitis was delayed-onset (5 months to 10 years postoperatively) and bleb-associated in 9 eyes and trauma-related in 1. All isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, and the aminoglycosides, and they were resistant to vancomycin; resistance to ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfa was 11%. Although presenting vision was hand motion or worse in 7 of 10 eyes, all but 3 regained baseline visual acuity (including two eyes in which the post-treatment course was complicated by retinal detachment and one eye with coexistent traumatic injuries). CONCLUSION: Endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species is usually delayed-onset and bleb-associated. Although patients usually present with a profound decrease in vision, the organisms are sensitive to most antibiotics and, unlike most series of delayed-onset bleb-associated endophthalmitis, visual outcomes are generally good unless coexistent ocular morbidities exist.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)788-790
Number of pages3
JournalAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume132
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 15 2001

Fingerprint

Moraxella
Endophthalmitis
Blister
Trimethoprim Resistance
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Ampicillin Resistance
Moraxella (Branhamella) catarrhalis
Ceftazidime
Wounds and Injuries
Aminoglycosides
Retinal Detachment
Vancomycin
Ciprofloxacin
Visual Acuity
Medical Records
Hand
Morbidity

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ophthalmology

Cite this

Berrocal, Audina M. ; Scott, Ingrid ; Miller, Darlene ; Flynn, Harry W. / Endophthalmitis caused by moraxella species. In: American Journal of Ophthalmology. 2001 ; Vol. 132, No. 5. pp. 788-790.
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abstract = "PURPOSE: To report the incidence, clinical presentation, antibiotic sensitivities, and treatment outcomes for endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species. METHODS: Consecutive interventional case series. Medical records were reviewed of all patients treated at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between 1991 and 2000 for endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species. RESULTS: Moraxella species were recovered from 9 patients (10 eyes), or 1.3{\%} (10 of 757) of all culture-proven bacterial endophthalmitis cases; Moraxella catarrhalis was recovered from 7 eyes and Moraxella osloensis from 3. Endophthalmitis was delayed-onset (5 months to 10 years postoperatively) and bleb-associated in 9 eyes and trauma-related in 1. All isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, and the aminoglycosides, and they were resistant to vancomycin; resistance to ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfa was 11{\%}. Although presenting vision was hand motion or worse in 7 of 10 eyes, all but 3 regained baseline visual acuity (including two eyes in which the post-treatment course was complicated by retinal detachment and one eye with coexistent traumatic injuries). CONCLUSION: Endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species is usually delayed-onset and bleb-associated. Although patients usually present with a profound decrease in vision, the organisms are sensitive to most antibiotics and, unlike most series of delayed-onset bleb-associated endophthalmitis, visual outcomes are generally good unless coexistent ocular morbidities exist.",
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Endophthalmitis caused by moraxella species. / Berrocal, Audina M.; Scott, Ingrid; Miller, Darlene; Flynn, Harry W.

In: American Journal of Ophthalmology, Vol. 132, No. 5, 15.11.2001, p. 788-790.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Flynn, Harry W.

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N2 - PURPOSE: To report the incidence, clinical presentation, antibiotic sensitivities, and treatment outcomes for endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species. METHODS: Consecutive interventional case series. Medical records were reviewed of all patients treated at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between 1991 and 2000 for endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species. RESULTS: Moraxella species were recovered from 9 patients (10 eyes), or 1.3% (10 of 757) of all culture-proven bacterial endophthalmitis cases; Moraxella catarrhalis was recovered from 7 eyes and Moraxella osloensis from 3. Endophthalmitis was delayed-onset (5 months to 10 years postoperatively) and bleb-associated in 9 eyes and trauma-related in 1. All isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, and the aminoglycosides, and they were resistant to vancomycin; resistance to ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfa was 11%. Although presenting vision was hand motion or worse in 7 of 10 eyes, all but 3 regained baseline visual acuity (including two eyes in which the post-treatment course was complicated by retinal detachment and one eye with coexistent traumatic injuries). CONCLUSION: Endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species is usually delayed-onset and bleb-associated. Although patients usually present with a profound decrease in vision, the organisms are sensitive to most antibiotics and, unlike most series of delayed-onset bleb-associated endophthalmitis, visual outcomes are generally good unless coexistent ocular morbidities exist.

AB - PURPOSE: To report the incidence, clinical presentation, antibiotic sensitivities, and treatment outcomes for endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species. METHODS: Consecutive interventional case series. Medical records were reviewed of all patients treated at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute between 1991 and 2000 for endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species. RESULTS: Moraxella species were recovered from 9 patients (10 eyes), or 1.3% (10 of 757) of all culture-proven bacterial endophthalmitis cases; Moraxella catarrhalis was recovered from 7 eyes and Moraxella osloensis from 3. Endophthalmitis was delayed-onset (5 months to 10 years postoperatively) and bleb-associated in 9 eyes and trauma-related in 1. All isolates were sensitive to ceftazidime, ciprofloxacin, and the aminoglycosides, and they were resistant to vancomycin; resistance to ampicillin and trimethoprim/sulfa was 11%. Although presenting vision was hand motion or worse in 7 of 10 eyes, all but 3 regained baseline visual acuity (including two eyes in which the post-treatment course was complicated by retinal detachment and one eye with coexistent traumatic injuries). CONCLUSION: Endophthalmitis caused by Moraxella species is usually delayed-onset and bleb-associated. Although patients usually present with a profound decrease in vision, the organisms are sensitive to most antibiotics and, unlike most series of delayed-onset bleb-associated endophthalmitis, visual outcomes are generally good unless coexistent ocular morbidities exist.

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