Endotoxin-induced increases in regional glucose utilization by small intestine: A TNF-independent effect

C. H. Lang, J. C A Obih, G. J. Bagby, J. N. Bagwell, J. J. Spitzer

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Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase in glucose uptake was a generalized response along the length of the entire gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to assess the relative contributions of the mucosa and muscularis. The putative roles of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and blood flow in the metabolic response of the intestine to LPS were also examined. In vivo glucose uptake (R(g)) was determined for various segments of the GI tract under basal postabsorptive conditions and 3 h after intravenous injection of Escherichia coli LPS using 2-[14C]deoxyglucose. At this time, LPS-treated rats were euglycemic, and R(g) was elevated in all sections of the GI tract (52-96%). In control animals, mucosal R(g) accounted for 79% of the glucose uptake by the entire small intestine; LPS increased R(g) in both the mucosa and muscularis and did not alter this relationship. The LPS-induced increase in intestinal R(g) was not attenuated by pretreatment with TNF antibody. Cardiac output (CO) and intestinal blood flow, assessed using radiolabeled microspheres, were not different from control values 3 h after LPS. Blood flow to the muscularis was increased (120%) in all sections of the small intestine from LPS-treated rats. These results indicate that 3 h after a low dose of LPS, glucose uptake by the entire length of the GI tract was elevated, and the majority of increase was due to enhanced uptake by the mucosa, which was blood flow independent. Furthermore, the increased R(g) was not dependent on elevations in plasma glucose, insulin, or TNF levels. However, an increased blood flow to the muscularis was associated with an elevated R(g) in that region.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)G548-G555
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology
Volume260
Issue number4 23-4
StatePublished - Jan 1 1991

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Endotoxins
Small Intestine
Lipopolysaccharides
Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha
Glucose
Gastrointestinal Tract
Mucous Membrane
Deoxyglucose
Microspheres
Intravenous Injections
Cardiac Output
Intestines
Insulin
Escherichia coli
Antibodies

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Physiology
  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

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abstract = "The purpose of the present study was to determine whether the lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced increase in glucose uptake was a generalized response along the length of the entire gastrointestinal (GI) tract and to assess the relative contributions of the mucosa and muscularis. The putative roles of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and blood flow in the metabolic response of the intestine to LPS were also examined. In vivo glucose uptake (R(g)) was determined for various segments of the GI tract under basal postabsorptive conditions and 3 h after intravenous injection of Escherichia coli LPS using 2-[14C]deoxyglucose. At this time, LPS-treated rats were euglycemic, and R(g) was elevated in all sections of the GI tract (52-96{\%}). In control animals, mucosal R(g) accounted for 79{\%} of the glucose uptake by the entire small intestine; LPS increased R(g) in both the mucosa and muscularis and did not alter this relationship. The LPS-induced increase in intestinal R(g) was not attenuated by pretreatment with TNF antibody. Cardiac output (CO) and intestinal blood flow, assessed using radiolabeled microspheres, were not different from control values 3 h after LPS. Blood flow to the muscularis was increased (120{\%}) in all sections of the small intestine from LPS-treated rats. These results indicate that 3 h after a low dose of LPS, glucose uptake by the entire length of the GI tract was elevated, and the majority of increase was due to enhanced uptake by the mucosa, which was blood flow independent. Furthermore, the increased R(g) was not dependent on elevations in plasma glucose, insulin, or TNF levels. However, an increased blood flow to the muscularis was associated with an elevated R(g) in that region.",
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Endotoxin-induced increases in regional glucose utilization by small intestine : A TNF-independent effect. / Lang, C. H.; Obih, J. C A; Bagby, G. J.; Bagwell, J. N.; Spitzer, J. J.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Gastrointestinal and Liver Physiology, Vol. 260, No. 4 23-4, 01.01.1991, p. G548-G555.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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T2 - A TNF-independent effect

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AU - Obih, J. C A

AU - Bagby, G. J.

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