Engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus prevention: A feasibility study

Liza Rovniak, Melbourne F. Hovell, C. Richard Hofstetter, Elaine J. Blumberg, Carol L. Sipan, Marcia F. Batista, Ana P. Martinez-Donate, Mary M. Mulvihill, Guadalupe X. Ayala

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To explore the feasibility of engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. Design: Randomly selected business owners/managers were asked to display discreetly wrapped condoms and brochures, both of which were provided free-of-charge for 3 months. Assessments were conducted at baseline, midprogram, and post-program. Customer feedback was obtained through an online survey. Setting: Participants were selected from a San Diego, California neighborhood with a high rate of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Participants: Fifty-one business owners/managers who represented 10 retail categories, and 52 customers. Measures: Participation rates, descriptive characteristics, number of condoms and brochures distributed, customer feedback, business owners'/managers' program satisfaction, and business owners'/managers' willingness to provide future support for HIV prevention were measured. Analysis: Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Fisher's exact, and McNemar's tests were used to analyze data. Results: The 20 business owners/managers (39%) who agreed to distribute condoms and brochures reported fewer years in business and more employees than those who agreed only to distribute brochures (20%) or who refused to participate (41 %; p <.05). Bars were the easiest of ten retail categories to recruit. Businesses with more employees and customers distributed more condoms and brochures (p <.05). More than 90% of customers supported distributing condoms and brochures in businesses, and 96% of business owners/managers described their program experience as positive. Conclusion: Businesses are willing to distribute condoms and brochures to prevent HIV. Policies to increase business participation in HIV prevention should be developed and tested.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)347-353
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume24
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2010

Fingerprint

Feasibility Studies
HIV
Pamphlets
manager
customer
Condoms
community
employee
participation
online survey
Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome
experience

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Health(social science)
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Rovniak, L., Hovell, M. F., Richard Hofstetter, C., Blumberg, E. J., Sipan, C. L., Batista, M. F., ... Ayala, G. X. (2010). Engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus prevention: A feasibility study. American Journal of Health Promotion, 24(5), 347-353. https://doi.org/10.4278/ajhp.080721-ARB-129
Rovniak, Liza ; Hovell, Melbourne F. ; Richard Hofstetter, C. ; Blumberg, Elaine J. ; Sipan, Carol L. ; Batista, Marcia F. ; Martinez-Donate, Ana P. ; Mulvihill, Mary M. ; Ayala, Guadalupe X. / Engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus prevention : A feasibility study. In: American Journal of Health Promotion. 2010 ; Vol. 24, No. 5. pp. 347-353.
@article{9de121a047354b4d8de6d1b249779686,
title = "Engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus prevention: A feasibility study",
abstract = "Purpose: To explore the feasibility of engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. Design: Randomly selected business owners/managers were asked to display discreetly wrapped condoms and brochures, both of which were provided free-of-charge for 3 months. Assessments were conducted at baseline, midprogram, and post-program. Customer feedback was obtained through an online survey. Setting: Participants were selected from a San Diego, California neighborhood with a high rate of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Participants: Fifty-one business owners/managers who represented 10 retail categories, and 52 customers. Measures: Participation rates, descriptive characteristics, number of condoms and brochures distributed, customer feedback, business owners'/managers' program satisfaction, and business owners'/managers' willingness to provide future support for HIV prevention were measured. Analysis: Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Fisher's exact, and McNemar's tests were used to analyze data. Results: The 20 business owners/managers (39{\%}) who agreed to distribute condoms and brochures reported fewer years in business and more employees than those who agreed only to distribute brochures (20{\%}) or who refused to participate (41 {\%}; p <.05). Bars were the easiest of ten retail categories to recruit. Businesses with more employees and customers distributed more condoms and brochures (p <.05). More than 90{\%} of customers supported distributing condoms and brochures in businesses, and 96{\%} of business owners/managers described their program experience as positive. Conclusion: Businesses are willing to distribute condoms and brochures to prevent HIV. Policies to increase business participation in HIV prevention should be developed and tested.",
author = "Liza Rovniak and Hovell, {Melbourne F.} and {Richard Hofstetter}, C. and Blumberg, {Elaine J.} and Sipan, {Carol L.} and Batista, {Marcia F.} and Martinez-Donate, {Ana P.} and Mulvihill, {Mary M.} and Ayala, {Guadalupe X.}",
year = "2010",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.4278/ajhp.080721-ARB-129",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "24",
pages = "347--353",
journal = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
issn = "0890-1171",
publisher = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
number = "5",

}

Rovniak, L, Hovell, MF, Richard Hofstetter, C, Blumberg, EJ, Sipan, CL, Batista, MF, Martinez-Donate, AP, Mulvihill, MM & Ayala, GX 2010, 'Engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus prevention: A feasibility study', American Journal of Health Promotion, vol. 24, no. 5, pp. 347-353. https://doi.org/10.4278/ajhp.080721-ARB-129

Engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus prevention : A feasibility study. / Rovniak, Liza; Hovell, Melbourne F.; Richard Hofstetter, C.; Blumberg, Elaine J.; Sipan, Carol L.; Batista, Marcia F.; Martinez-Donate, Ana P.; Mulvihill, Mary M.; Ayala, Guadalupe X.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 24, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 347-353.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus prevention

T2 - A feasibility study

AU - Rovniak, Liza

AU - Hovell, Melbourne F.

AU - Richard Hofstetter, C.

AU - Blumberg, Elaine J.

AU - Sipan, Carol L.

AU - Batista, Marcia F.

AU - Martinez-Donate, Ana P.

AU - Mulvihill, Mary M.

AU - Ayala, Guadalupe X.

PY - 2010/5/1

Y1 - 2010/5/1

N2 - Purpose: To explore the feasibility of engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. Design: Randomly selected business owners/managers were asked to display discreetly wrapped condoms and brochures, both of which were provided free-of-charge for 3 months. Assessments were conducted at baseline, midprogram, and post-program. Customer feedback was obtained through an online survey. Setting: Participants were selected from a San Diego, California neighborhood with a high rate of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Participants: Fifty-one business owners/managers who represented 10 retail categories, and 52 customers. Measures: Participation rates, descriptive characteristics, number of condoms and brochures distributed, customer feedback, business owners'/managers' program satisfaction, and business owners'/managers' willingness to provide future support for HIV prevention were measured. Analysis: Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Fisher's exact, and McNemar's tests were used to analyze data. Results: The 20 business owners/managers (39%) who agreed to distribute condoms and brochures reported fewer years in business and more employees than those who agreed only to distribute brochures (20%) or who refused to participate (41 %; p <.05). Bars were the easiest of ten retail categories to recruit. Businesses with more employees and customers distributed more condoms and brochures (p <.05). More than 90% of customers supported distributing condoms and brochures in businesses, and 96% of business owners/managers described their program experience as positive. Conclusion: Businesses are willing to distribute condoms and brochures to prevent HIV. Policies to increase business participation in HIV prevention should be developed and tested.

AB - Purpose: To explore the feasibility of engaging community businesses in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) prevention. Design: Randomly selected business owners/managers were asked to display discreetly wrapped condoms and brochures, both of which were provided free-of-charge for 3 months. Assessments were conducted at baseline, midprogram, and post-program. Customer feedback was obtained through an online survey. Setting: Participants were selected from a San Diego, California neighborhood with a high rate of acquired immune deficiency syndrome. Participants: Fifty-one business owners/managers who represented 10 retail categories, and 52 customers. Measures: Participation rates, descriptive characteristics, number of condoms and brochures distributed, customer feedback, business owners'/managers' program satisfaction, and business owners'/managers' willingness to provide future support for HIV prevention were measured. Analysis: Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, Fisher's exact, and McNemar's tests were used to analyze data. Results: The 20 business owners/managers (39%) who agreed to distribute condoms and brochures reported fewer years in business and more employees than those who agreed only to distribute brochures (20%) or who refused to participate (41 %; p <.05). Bars were the easiest of ten retail categories to recruit. Businesses with more employees and customers distributed more condoms and brochures (p <.05). More than 90% of customers supported distributing condoms and brochures in businesses, and 96% of business owners/managers described their program experience as positive. Conclusion: Businesses are willing to distribute condoms and brochures to prevent HIV. Policies to increase business participation in HIV prevention should be developed and tested.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=77953258350&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=77953258350&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4278/ajhp.080721-ARB-129

DO - 10.4278/ajhp.080721-ARB-129

M3 - Article

C2 - 20465150

AN - SCOPUS:77953258350

VL - 24

SP - 347

EP - 353

JO - American Journal of Health Promotion

JF - American Journal of Health Promotion

SN - 0890-1171

IS - 5

ER -