Engineering plant-microbe symbiosis for rhizoremediation of heavy metals

Cindy H. Wu, Thomas Keith Wood, Ashok Mulchandani, Wilfred Chen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

156 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The use of plants for rehabilitation of heavy-metal-contaminated environments is an emerging area of interest because it provides an ecologically sound and safe method for restoration and remediation. Although a number of plant species are capable of hyperaccumulation of heavy metals, the technology is not applicable for remediating sites with multiple contaminants. A clever solution is to combine the advantages of microbe-plant symbiosis within the plant rhizosphere into an effective cleanup technology. We demonstrated that expression of a metal-binding peptide (EC20) in a rhizobacterium, Pseudomonas putida 06909, not only improved cadmium binding but also alleviated the cellular toxicity of cadmium. More importantly, inoculation of sunflower roots with the engineered rhizobacterium resulted in a marked decrease in cadmium phytotoxicity and a 40% increase in cadmium accumulation in the plant root. Owing to the significantly improved growth characteristics of both the rhizobacterium and plant, the use of EC20-expressing P. putida endowed with organic-degrading capabilities may be a promising strategy to remediate mixed organic-metal- contaminated sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1129-1134
Number of pages6
JournalApplied and Environmental Microbiology
Volume72
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2006

Fingerprint

Symbiosis
Heavy Metals
symbiosis
engineering
heavy metals
Cadmium
heavy metal
microorganisms
cadmium
rhizobacterium
Pseudomonas putida
Rhizobium
Metals
hyperaccumulation
Technology
Rhizosphere
metals
Plant Roots
metal binding
Helianthus

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biotechnology
  • Food Science
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology
  • Ecology

Cite this

Wu, Cindy H. ; Wood, Thomas Keith ; Mulchandani, Ashok ; Chen, Wilfred. / Engineering plant-microbe symbiosis for rhizoremediation of heavy metals. In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology. 2006 ; Vol. 72, No. 2. pp. 1129-1134.
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Engineering plant-microbe symbiosis for rhizoremediation of heavy metals. / Wu, Cindy H.; Wood, Thomas Keith; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred.

In: Applied and Environmental Microbiology, Vol. 72, No. 2, 01.02.2006, p. 1129-1134.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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