Enhanced biofilter treatment of urban stormwater by optimizing the hydraulic residence time in the media

Redahegn Sileshi, Robert Pitt, Shirley Elizabeth Clark

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Selecting the best media for a specific situation is critical when designing a biofilter or bioinfiltration stormwater control practice as the media affects the amount of runoff that is treated and the level of treatment that can be obtained. Appropriate hydraulic characteristics of the media, including treatment flow rate, clogging capacity, and water contact time, are needed to select the media and drainage system. This information, in combination with the media's ability to capture targeted pollutants with minimal clogging given the appropriate contact time, can be used to predict the performance of a biofilter device. This paper presents a series of tests being conducted to determine the hydraulic characteristics of sand-based filter media (having a variety of particles sizes representing a range of median particle sizes and uniformity coefficients) during pilot-scale trench tests. The drainage rate in biofiltration devices is usually controlled using an underdrain that is restricted with a small orifice or other flow-moderating component. These frequently fail as the orifices are usually very small (<10 mm) and are prone to clogging. A series of tests are conducted using a newly developed foundation drain material (SmartDrain™) that offers promise as a low flow control device with minimal clogging potential. A pilot-scale biofilter using a fiberglass trough 3m long and 0.6 × 0.6m in cross section is used to test the variables affecting the drainage characteristics of the SmartDrains™ (such as length, slope, hydraulic head, and type of sand media). The results indicated that slope of the SmartDrain™ material had no significant effect on the stage-discharge relationship whereas the length had a small effect on the discharge rate. The information collected during this study will assist stormwater managers in the design of biofilters needing a slowly draining device.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationWatershed Management Conference 2010
Subtitle of host publicationInnovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference
Pages587-597
Number of pages11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
EventWatershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Madison, WI, United States
Duration: Aug 23 2010Aug 27 2010

Publication series

NameWatershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference
Volume394

Other

OtherWatershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change
CountryUnited States
CityMadison, WI
Period8/23/108/27/10

Fingerprint

stormwater
residence time
hydraulics
stage-discharge relationship
particle size
drainage
biofiltration
sand
flow control
hydraulic head
low flow
drain
trench
trough
cross section
runoff
filter
test
pollutant
rate

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Water Science and Technology

Cite this

Sileshi, R., Pitt, R., & Clark, S. E. (2010). Enhanced biofilter treatment of urban stormwater by optimizing the hydraulic residence time in the media. In Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference (pp. 587-597). (Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference; Vol. 394). https://doi.org/10.1061/41148(389)54
Sileshi, Redahegn ; Pitt, Robert ; Clark, Shirley Elizabeth. / Enhanced biofilter treatment of urban stormwater by optimizing the hydraulic residence time in the media. Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference. 2010. pp. 587-597 (Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference).
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Sileshi, R, Pitt, R & Clark, SE 2010, Enhanced biofilter treatment of urban stormwater by optimizing the hydraulic residence time in the media. in Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference. Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference, vol. 394, pp. 587-597, Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change, Madison, WI, United States, 8/23/10. https://doi.org/10.1061/41148(389)54

Enhanced biofilter treatment of urban stormwater by optimizing the hydraulic residence time in the media. / Sileshi, Redahegn; Pitt, Robert; Clark, Shirley Elizabeth.

Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference. 2010. p. 587-597 (Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference; Vol. 394).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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Sileshi R, Pitt R, Clark SE. Enhanced biofilter treatment of urban stormwater by optimizing the hydraulic residence time in the media. In Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference. 2010. p. 587-597. (Watershed Management Conference 2010: Innovations in Watershed Management under Land Use and Climate Change - Proceedings of the 2010 Watershed Management Conference). https://doi.org/10.1061/41148(389)54