Enhancing Equity in Gifted Education: A framework for examining assessments drawing on the theory of multiple intelligences

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In the United States, poor and minority students are disproportionately excluded from programs for the gifted. Current identification practices for gifted education programs are a primary barrier for these youngsters. This study investigated three alternative assessments for identifying students. Each was said to draw on the theory of multiple intelligences (Gardner, 1983) and to increase the identification of traditionally under-served youngsters. This investigation asked: (1) Is it reasonable to associate increases in the identification of under-served youngsters with these assessments? (2) Is it reasonable to associate each assessment with the theory of multiple intelligences? To answer these questions, qualitative data were analyzed against a framework of eight criteria. This revealed that no assessment met all eight criteria; each met a different subset of the eight.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-161
Number of pages19
JournalHigh Ability Studies
Volume10
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1999

Fingerprint

intelligence
equity
education
student
minority

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education

Cite this

@article{4164d7dd8d404a1d9a452b8e1d1e5ecc,
title = "Enhancing Equity in Gifted Education: A framework for examining assessments drawing on the theory of multiple intelligences",
abstract = "In the United States, poor and minority students are disproportionately excluded from programs for the gifted. Current identification practices for gifted education programs are a primary barrier for these youngsters. This study investigated three alternative assessments for identifying students. Each was said to draw on the theory of multiple intelligences (Gardner, 1983) and to increase the identification of traditionally under-served youngsters. This investigation asked: (1) Is it reasonable to associate increases in the identification of under-served youngsters with these assessments? (2) Is it reasonable to associate each assessment with the theory of multiple intelligences? To answer these questions, qualitative data were analyzed against a framework of eight criteria. This revealed that no assessment met all eight criteria; each met a different subset of the eight.",
author = "Kornhaber, {Mindy L.}",
year = "1999",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1080/1359813990100203",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "10",
pages = "143--161",
journal = "High Ability Studies",
issn = "1359-8139",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Enhancing Equity in Gifted Education

T2 - A framework for examining assessments drawing on the theory of multiple intelligences

AU - Kornhaber, Mindy L.

PY - 1999/1/1

Y1 - 1999/1/1

N2 - In the United States, poor and minority students are disproportionately excluded from programs for the gifted. Current identification practices for gifted education programs are a primary barrier for these youngsters. This study investigated three alternative assessments for identifying students. Each was said to draw on the theory of multiple intelligences (Gardner, 1983) and to increase the identification of traditionally under-served youngsters. This investigation asked: (1) Is it reasonable to associate increases in the identification of under-served youngsters with these assessments? (2) Is it reasonable to associate each assessment with the theory of multiple intelligences? To answer these questions, qualitative data were analyzed against a framework of eight criteria. This revealed that no assessment met all eight criteria; each met a different subset of the eight.

AB - In the United States, poor and minority students are disproportionately excluded from programs for the gifted. Current identification practices for gifted education programs are a primary barrier for these youngsters. This study investigated three alternative assessments for identifying students. Each was said to draw on the theory of multiple intelligences (Gardner, 1983) and to increase the identification of traditionally under-served youngsters. This investigation asked: (1) Is it reasonable to associate increases in the identification of under-served youngsters with these assessments? (2) Is it reasonable to associate each assessment with the theory of multiple intelligences? To answer these questions, qualitative data were analyzed against a framework of eight criteria. This revealed that no assessment met all eight criteria; each met a different subset of the eight.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0346341108&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0346341108&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/1359813990100203

DO - 10.1080/1359813990100203

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0346341108

VL - 10

SP - 143

EP - 161

JO - High Ability Studies

JF - High Ability Studies

SN - 1359-8139

IS - 2

ER -