Enrichment, isolation, and characterization of dominant bacteria that degrade haloacetic acids in drinking water

Ping Zhang, Raymond M. Hozalski, Timothy M. LaPara, Yuefeng F. Xie, Anne K. Camper, Lynne Leach

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Chlorination of drinking water and wastewater generates a group of byproducts including haloacetic acids (HAAs) that pose serious risks on human health. Dominant bacterial populations functioning in the biodegradation of HAAs in drinking water, pipe wall biofilm, granular activated carbon (GAC) filter biofilm, and wastewater were investigated by continuous enrichment and isolation of organisms capable of growth with three dominant HAAs, monochloroacetic acide (MCAA), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA), or trichloroacetic acid (TCAA), as sole carbon and energy source. Phylogenetic analysis, dehalogenase genes, and characterization of HAA degradation of the organisms in the environments is underway.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAmerican Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007
Subtitle of host publicationFast Tracks to Water Quality
Pages3178-3183
Number of pages6
StatePublished - Dec 1 2007
EventWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality - Charlotte, NC, United States
Duration: Nov 4 2007Nov 8 2007

Publication series

NameAmerican Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality

Other

OtherWater Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality
CountryUnited States
CityCharlotte, NC
Period11/4/0711/8/07

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Safety, Risk, Reliability and Quality
  • Water Science and Technology
  • Geography, Planning and Development

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Enrichment, isolation, and characterization of dominant bacteria that degrade haloacetic acids in drinking water'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this

    Zhang, P., Hozalski, R. M., LaPara, T. M., Xie, Y. F., Camper, A. K., & Leach, L. (2007). Enrichment, isolation, and characterization of dominant bacteria that degrade haloacetic acids in drinking water. In American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality (pp. 3178-3183). (American Water Works Association - Water Quality Technology Conference and Exposition 2007: Fast Tracks to Water Quality).