Environmental monitoring and exploratory development of a predictive model for dead spot of creeping bentgrass

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Dead spot of creeping bentgrass is incited by Ophiosphaerella agrostis. The objectives of this 3-year field study were to: (i) elucidate environmental conditions associated with the expression of dead spot symptoms, (ii) develop a model to assist in predicting the appearance of dead spot symptoms and epidemics in creeping bentgrass, and (iii) elucidate the association between ascospore release and the appearance of new dead spot symptoms. Environmental parameters measured included relative humidity (RH), air (AT) and soil (ST) temperatures, solar irradiance (SOL), precipitation and irrigation (RAIN), and leaf wetness duration (LWD). Dead spot symptoms generally did not occur at temperatures (air or soil) below 15°C. Two descriptive models were developed that predicted the appearance of dead spot symptoms with an accuracy of 74 to 80%. Between 1 May and 31 October 2000 to 2002, the appearance of new dead spot infection centers was most accurately predicted (80%) by the single parameter of ST Mean ≥ 20°C. In years with severe levels of dead spot, the occurrence of major infection events was predicted on 37 of 40 days (93%). A combination of elevated air (ATMax ≥ 27°C) and soil (ST Mean ≥ 18°C) temperatures, low relative humidity (RH Mean ≤ 80%), shortened periods of leaf wetness (LWD ≤ 14 h), and high levels of solar radiation (SOLMean ≥ 230 W m .2) were associated with the development of major dead spot epidemics. Ascospore discharge and the appearance of new infection centers occurred in a cyclic pattern that peaked about every 12 days. New infection centers appeared 3 to 10 days after the release of a large number of ascospores.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-573
Number of pages9
JournalPlant disease
Volume91
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2007

Fingerprint

Agrostis stolonifera
environmental monitoring
ascospores
relative humidity
infection
soil temperature
Ophiosphaerella
solar radiation
air
Agrostis
duration
air temperature
irrigation
environmental factors
leaf wetness
soil
temperature

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

Cite this

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title = "Environmental monitoring and exploratory development of a predictive model for dead spot of creeping bentgrass",
abstract = "Dead spot of creeping bentgrass is incited by Ophiosphaerella agrostis. The objectives of this 3-year field study were to: (i) elucidate environmental conditions associated with the expression of dead spot symptoms, (ii) develop a model to assist in predicting the appearance of dead spot symptoms and epidemics in creeping bentgrass, and (iii) elucidate the association between ascospore release and the appearance of new dead spot symptoms. Environmental parameters measured included relative humidity (RH), air (AT) and soil (ST) temperatures, solar irradiance (SOL), precipitation and irrigation (RAIN), and leaf wetness duration (LWD). Dead spot symptoms generally did not occur at temperatures (air or soil) below 15°C. Two descriptive models were developed that predicted the appearance of dead spot symptoms with an accuracy of 74 to 80{\%}. Between 1 May and 31 October 2000 to 2002, the appearance of new dead spot infection centers was most accurately predicted (80{\%}) by the single parameter of ST Mean ≥ 20°C. In years with severe levels of dead spot, the occurrence of major infection events was predicted on 37 of 40 days (93{\%}). A combination of elevated air (ATMax ≥ 27°C) and soil (ST Mean ≥ 18°C) temperatures, low relative humidity (RH Mean ≤ 80{\%}), shortened periods of leaf wetness (LWD ≤ 14 h), and high levels of solar radiation (SOLMean ≥ 230 W m .2) were associated with the development of major dead spot epidemics. Ascospore discharge and the appearance of new infection centers occurred in a cyclic pattern that peaked about every 12 days. New infection centers appeared 3 to 10 days after the release of a large number of ascospores.",
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Environmental monitoring and exploratory development of a predictive model for dead spot of creeping bentgrass. / Kaminski, III, John Edward; Dernoeden, Peter H.; Fidanza, Michael Anthony.

In: Plant disease, Vol. 91, No. 5, 01.05.2007, p. 565-573.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Kaminski, III, John Edward

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