Environmental variability in the early rearing environment generates behaviourally flexible cod

Implications for rehabilitating wild populations

Victoria Ann Braithwaite-Read, Anne G.V. Salvanes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

104 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The release of hatchery-reared fishes for restoring threatened and endangered populations is one of the most controversial issues in applied ecology. A central issue has been to determine whether releases cause extinction of local wild populations. This may arise either through domesticated or non-local fishes hybridizing with wild fishes, or through inappropriate behavioural interactions; for example, many hatchery fishes show exaggerated aggressive and competitive behaviour and out-compete wild counterparts. The impact of the impoverished hatchery environment in shaping behaviour is only now receiving attention. Attempts to counteract hatchery-related behavioural deficiencies have utilized intensive training programmes shortly before the fishes are released. However, we show here that simple exposure to variable spatial and foraging cues in the standard hatchery environment generates fishes with enhanced behavioural traits that are probably associated with improved survival in the wild. It appears that fishes need to experience a varying and changeable environment to learn and develop flexible behaviour. Using variable hatchery rearing environments to generate suitable phenotypes in combination with a knowledge of appropriate local genotypes, rehabilitation of wild fishes is likely to succeed, where to date it has largely failed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1107-1113
Number of pages7
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume272
Issue number1568
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 7 2005

Fingerprint

Gadiformes
cod (fish)
wild population
Fish
hatcheries
rearing
Fishes
hatchery
fish
Population
Fisheries
wild fish
Competitive Behavior
Ecology
education programs
Cues
extinction
Rehabilitation
Genotype
foraging

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Medicine(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Environmental Science(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

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abstract = "The release of hatchery-reared fishes for restoring threatened and endangered populations is one of the most controversial issues in applied ecology. A central issue has been to determine whether releases cause extinction of local wild populations. This may arise either through domesticated or non-local fishes hybridizing with wild fishes, or through inappropriate behavioural interactions; for example, many hatchery fishes show exaggerated aggressive and competitive behaviour and out-compete wild counterparts. The impact of the impoverished hatchery environment in shaping behaviour is only now receiving attention. Attempts to counteract hatchery-related behavioural deficiencies have utilized intensive training programmes shortly before the fishes are released. However, we show here that simple exposure to variable spatial and foraging cues in the standard hatchery environment generates fishes with enhanced behavioural traits that are probably associated with improved survival in the wild. It appears that fishes need to experience a varying and changeable environment to learn and develop flexible behaviour. Using variable hatchery rearing environments to generate suitable phenotypes in combination with a knowledge of appropriate local genotypes, rehabilitation of wild fishes is likely to succeed, where to date it has largely failed.",
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Environmental variability in the early rearing environment generates behaviourally flexible cod : Implications for rehabilitating wild populations. / Braithwaite-Read, Victoria Ann; Salvanes, Anne G.V.

In: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, Vol. 272, No. 1568, 07.06.2005, p. 1107-1113.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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