Epstein-Barr virus vaccine development: A lytic and latent protein cocktail

Timothy D. Lockey, Xiaoyan Zhan, Sherri Surman, Clare E. Sample, Julia L. Hurwitz

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is the causative agent of acute infectious mononucleosis and associates with malignancies such as Burkitt lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Additionally, EBV is responsible for B-lymphoproliferative disease in the context of HIV-infection, genetic immunodeficiencies and organ/stem-cell transplantation. Here we discuss past and current efforts to design an EBV vaccine. We further describe preliminary studies of a novel cocktail vaccine expressing both lytic and latent EBV proteins. Specifically, a tetrameric vaccinia virus (VV) -based vaccine was formulated to express the EBV lytic proteins gp350 and gp110, and the latent proteins EBNA-2 and EBNA-3C. In a proof-of-concept study, mice were vaccinated with the individual or mixed VV. Each of the passenger genes was expressed in vivo at levels sufficient to elicit binding antibody responses. Neutralizing gp350-specific antibodies were also elicited, as were EBV-specific T-cell responses, following inoculation of mice with the single or mixed VV. Results encourage further development of the cocktail vaccine strategy as a potentially powerful weapon against EBV infection and disease in humans.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5916-5927
Number of pages12
JournalFrontiers in Bioscience
Volume13
Issue number15
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2008

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Human Herpesvirus 4
Viruses
Vaccines
Vaccinia virus
Proteins
Infectious Mononucleosis
Epstein-Barr Virus Infections
Weapons
Burkitt Lymphoma
Stem Cell Transplantation
Virus Diseases
Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma
HIV Infections
Antibody Formation
T-cells
Antibodies
T-Lymphocytes
Stem cells
Genes
Neoplasms

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Lockey, Timothy D. ; Zhan, Xiaoyan ; Surman, Sherri ; Sample, Clare E. ; Hurwitz, Julia L. / Epstein-Barr virus vaccine development : A lytic and latent protein cocktail. In: Frontiers in Bioscience. 2008 ; Vol. 13, No. 15. pp. 5916-5927.
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Epstein-Barr virus vaccine development : A lytic and latent protein cocktail. / Lockey, Timothy D.; Zhan, Xiaoyan; Surman, Sherri; Sample, Clare E.; Hurwitz, Julia L.

In: Frontiers in Bioscience, Vol. 13, No. 15, 01.05.2008, p. 5916-5927.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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