Erosion performance and characterization of nanolayer (Ti,Cr)N hard coatings for gas turbine engine compressor blade applications

Michael W. Reedy, Timothy John Eden, John K. Potter, Douglas Edward Wolfe

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

30 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

(Ti,Cr)N nanolayer coatings were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V, 17-4PH and Inconel 718 substrates using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition for improved erosion and corrosion resistance. Coating corrosion performance was highly dependent on the coating thickness and packing factors and correlated with increased chromium content within the (Ti,Cr)N nanolayer coatings. The change in cathode current predominantly affected coating thickness and the bias affected the packing factor. Erosion tests of the coated and uncoated substrates at both 30° and 90° erodent impingement angles were conducted using angular aluminum oxide media at particle velocities up to 145 m/s. Chromium evaporator current and substrate bias were varied to change film stoichiometry and microstructure for erosion performance evaluation. When chromium evaporator current was varied, the increase in chromium content led to an increase in binary CrN phase volume and a decrease in TiN phase volume. The increase in CrN phase volume decreased both hardness and erosion performance at both impingement angles. Lower bias values resulted in better erosion performance. At 30° erodent impingement, all coated samples outperformed the uncoated substrate; whereas, for 90° impingement, only coatings deposited at low bias values (- 25 V, - 50 V, and - 100 V) and high Ti:Cr ratios (>. 2.4) outperformed the uncoated substrate. The primary coating failure mechanism was microchipping.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)464-472
Number of pages9
JournalSurface and Coatings Technology
Volume206
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 25 2011

Fingerprint

compressor blades
gas turbine engines
Hard coatings
Turbomachine blades
erosion
Gas turbines
Compressors
Erosion
Turbines
impingement
coatings
Coatings
Chromium
chromium
Substrates
evaporators
Evaporators
Inconel (trademark)
Aluminum Oxide
Physical vapor deposition

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Surfaces and Interfaces
  • Surfaces, Coatings and Films
  • Materials Chemistry

Cite this

@article{b1692d8586a34975b6a7a9f058de36e4,
title = "Erosion performance and characterization of nanolayer (Ti,Cr)N hard coatings for gas turbine engine compressor blade applications",
abstract = "(Ti,Cr)N nanolayer coatings were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V, 17-4PH and Inconel 718 substrates using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition for improved erosion and corrosion resistance. Coating corrosion performance was highly dependent on the coating thickness and packing factors and correlated with increased chromium content within the (Ti,Cr)N nanolayer coatings. The change in cathode current predominantly affected coating thickness and the bias affected the packing factor. Erosion tests of the coated and uncoated substrates at both 30° and 90° erodent impingement angles were conducted using angular aluminum oxide media at particle velocities up to 145 m/s. Chromium evaporator current and substrate bias were varied to change film stoichiometry and microstructure for erosion performance evaluation. When chromium evaporator current was varied, the increase in chromium content led to an increase in binary CrN phase volume and a decrease in TiN phase volume. The increase in CrN phase volume decreased both hardness and erosion performance at both impingement angles. Lower bias values resulted in better erosion performance. At 30° erodent impingement, all coated samples outperformed the uncoated substrate; whereas, for 90° impingement, only coatings deposited at low bias values (- 25 V, - 50 V, and - 100 V) and high Ti:Cr ratios (>. 2.4) outperformed the uncoated substrate. The primary coating failure mechanism was microchipping.",
author = "Reedy, {Michael W.} and Eden, {Timothy John} and Potter, {John K.} and Wolfe, {Douglas Edward}",
year = "2011",
month = "10",
day = "25",
doi = "10.1016/j.surfcoat.2011.07.063",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "206",
pages = "464--472",
journal = "Surface and Coatings Technology",
issn = "0257-8972",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "2-3",

}

Erosion performance and characterization of nanolayer (Ti,Cr)N hard coatings for gas turbine engine compressor blade applications. / Reedy, Michael W.; Eden, Timothy John; Potter, John K.; Wolfe, Douglas Edward.

In: Surface and Coatings Technology, Vol. 206, No. 2-3, 25.10.2011, p. 464-472.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Erosion performance and characterization of nanolayer (Ti,Cr)N hard coatings for gas turbine engine compressor blade applications

AU - Reedy, Michael W.

AU - Eden, Timothy John

AU - Potter, John K.

AU - Wolfe, Douglas Edward

PY - 2011/10/25

Y1 - 2011/10/25

N2 - (Ti,Cr)N nanolayer coatings were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V, 17-4PH and Inconel 718 substrates using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition for improved erosion and corrosion resistance. Coating corrosion performance was highly dependent on the coating thickness and packing factors and correlated with increased chromium content within the (Ti,Cr)N nanolayer coatings. The change in cathode current predominantly affected coating thickness and the bias affected the packing factor. Erosion tests of the coated and uncoated substrates at both 30° and 90° erodent impingement angles were conducted using angular aluminum oxide media at particle velocities up to 145 m/s. Chromium evaporator current and substrate bias were varied to change film stoichiometry and microstructure for erosion performance evaluation. When chromium evaporator current was varied, the increase in chromium content led to an increase in binary CrN phase volume and a decrease in TiN phase volume. The increase in CrN phase volume decreased both hardness and erosion performance at both impingement angles. Lower bias values resulted in better erosion performance. At 30° erodent impingement, all coated samples outperformed the uncoated substrate; whereas, for 90° impingement, only coatings deposited at low bias values (- 25 V, - 50 V, and - 100 V) and high Ti:Cr ratios (>. 2.4) outperformed the uncoated substrate. The primary coating failure mechanism was microchipping.

AB - (Ti,Cr)N nanolayer coatings were deposited on Ti-6Al-4V, 17-4PH and Inconel 718 substrates using cathodic arc physical vapor deposition for improved erosion and corrosion resistance. Coating corrosion performance was highly dependent on the coating thickness and packing factors and correlated with increased chromium content within the (Ti,Cr)N nanolayer coatings. The change in cathode current predominantly affected coating thickness and the bias affected the packing factor. Erosion tests of the coated and uncoated substrates at both 30° and 90° erodent impingement angles were conducted using angular aluminum oxide media at particle velocities up to 145 m/s. Chromium evaporator current and substrate bias were varied to change film stoichiometry and microstructure for erosion performance evaluation. When chromium evaporator current was varied, the increase in chromium content led to an increase in binary CrN phase volume and a decrease in TiN phase volume. The increase in CrN phase volume decreased both hardness and erosion performance at both impingement angles. Lower bias values resulted in better erosion performance. At 30° erodent impingement, all coated samples outperformed the uncoated substrate; whereas, for 90° impingement, only coatings deposited at low bias values (- 25 V, - 50 V, and - 100 V) and high Ti:Cr ratios (>. 2.4) outperformed the uncoated substrate. The primary coating failure mechanism was microchipping.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80052387046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80052387046&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2011.07.063

DO - 10.1016/j.surfcoat.2011.07.063

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:80052387046

VL - 206

SP - 464

EP - 472

JO - Surface and Coatings Technology

JF - Surface and Coatings Technology

SN - 0257-8972

IS - 2-3

ER -