Essential amino acid supplementation by gut microbes of a wood-feeding cerambycid

Paul A. Ayayee, Thomas Larsen, Cristina Rosa, Gary Felton, James Gregory Ferry, Kelli Hoover

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Insects are unable to synthesize essential amino acids (EAAs) de novo, thus rely on dietary or symbiotic sources for them. Wood is a poor resource of nitrogen in general, and EAAs in particular. In this study, we investigated whether gut microbiota of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), a cerambycid that feeds in the heartwood of healthy host trees, serve as sources of EAAs to their host under different dietary conditions. δ13C-stable isotope analyses revealed significant δ13C-enrichment (3.4 ± 0.1‰; mean ± SEM) across five EAAs in wood-fed larvae relative to their woody diet. δ13C values for the consumers greater than 1‰ indicate significant contributions from non-dietary EAA sources (symbionts in this case). In contrast, δ13C-enrichment of artificial diet-fed larvae (controls) relative to their food source was markedly less (1.7 ± 0.1‰) than was observed in wood-fed larvae, yet still exceeded the threshold of 1‰. A predictive model based on δ13CEAA signatures of five EAAs from representative bacterial, fungal, and plant samples identified symbiotic bacteria and fungi as the likely supplementary sources of EAA in wood-fed larvae. Using the same model, but with an artificial diet as the dietary source, we identified minor supplementary bacterial sources of EAA in artificial diet-fed larvae. This study highlights how microbes associated with A. glabripennis can serve as a source of EAAs when fed on nutrient-limited diets, potentially circumventing the dietary limitations of feeding on woody substrates.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)66-73
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Entomology
Volume45
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2016

Fingerprint

essential amino acids
digestive system
amino acid
microorganisms
Anoplophora glabripennis
artificial diet
larva
artificial diets
larvae
diet
heartwood
symbiont
intestinal microorganisms
symbionts
stable isotopes
beetle
stable isotope
scanning electron microscopy
fungus
insect

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

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abstract = "Insects are unable to synthesize essential amino acids (EAAs) de novo, thus rely on dietary or symbiotic sources for them. Wood is a poor resource of nitrogen in general, and EAAs in particular. In this study, we investigated whether gut microbiota of the Asian longhorned beetle, Anoplophora glabripennis (Motschulsky), a cerambycid that feeds in the heartwood of healthy host trees, serve as sources of EAAs to their host under different dietary conditions. δ13C-stable isotope analyses revealed significant δ13C-enrichment (3.4 ± 0.1‰; mean ± SEM) across five EAAs in wood-fed larvae relative to their woody diet. δ13C values for the consumers greater than 1‰ indicate significant contributions from non-dietary EAA sources (symbionts in this case). In contrast, δ13C-enrichment of artificial diet-fed larvae (controls) relative to their food source was markedly less (1.7 ± 0.1‰) than was observed in wood-fed larvae, yet still exceeded the threshold of 1‰. A predictive model based on δ13CEAA signatures of five EAAs from representative bacterial, fungal, and plant samples identified symbiotic bacteria and fungi as the likely supplementary sources of EAA in wood-fed larvae. Using the same model, but with an artificial diet as the dietary source, we identified minor supplementary bacterial sources of EAA in artificial diet-fed larvae. This study highlights how microbes associated with A. glabripennis can serve as a source of EAAs when fed on nutrient-limited diets, potentially circumventing the dietary limitations of feeding on woody substrates.",
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Essential amino acid supplementation by gut microbes of a wood-feeding cerambycid. / Ayayee, Paul A.; Larsen, Thomas; Rosa, Cristina; Felton, Gary; Ferry, James Gregory; Hoover, Kelli.

In: Environmental Entomology, Vol. 45, No. 1, 01.02.2016, p. 66-73.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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