Establishing a Voice for History in Schools: The First Methods Textbooks for History Instruction 1896–1902

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Abstract

This article is an examination of five early history methods textbooks. The textbooks reviewed here represent an overview of pre-1910 history curricula on a theoretical and developmental level, and offer a different view of history instruction. Historians Barnes and Fling and Caldwell created texts for the general or field market, Channing and Hart for students and teachers in public schools, and Mace and Bourne expressly for normal school and college preservice history teachers. Although Channing and Hart probably best represented and perhaps best captured the flavor of the recommendations made by the Committee of Seven, each of the five texts contributed to the traditional history curriculum by offering their descriptions and explanations of various facets of the overall program.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)482-514
Number of pages33
JournalTheory and Research in Social Education
Volume22
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

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history instruction
textbook
history
school
curriculum
prehistory
teacher
historian
examination
market
student

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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