Establishing classification and hierarchy in populated place labeling for multiscale mapping for the National map

Stephen J. Butzler, Cynthia Ann Brewer, Wesley J. Stroh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Current standards for federal mapping call for use of the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) point layer for placement of United States populated place labels. However, this point layer contains limited classification information and hierarchy information, resulting in problems of map quality for database-driven, multi-scale, reference mapping, such as maps served by The National Map Viewer from USGS. Database-driven mapping often relies simply on what labels fit best in the map frame. Our research investigates alternative sources for labeling populated places, including polygons defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, such as incorporated place, census designated place (CDP), and economic place. Within each of these polygon layers we investigate relevant attributes from the decennial and economic censuses, such as population for incorporated places and CDPs, and the number of employees for economic places. The data selected are available for the entire country to serve national mapping requirements. This combination of data allows a more refined classification of populated places on maps that better represents relative importance. Visual importance on maps through scale should derive from more than simply residential population, but also economic importance, though comparison is made to this simpler case. We differentiate a fourth category of GNIS populated place points, essentially "neighborhoods" and related features-which are not incorporated places, CDPs, nor economic places. Populated places in this fourth class do not have federally defined boundaries, necessitating an alternative method for determining hierarchy in label presentation through scale.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)100-109
Number of pages10
JournalCartography and Geographic Information Science
Volume38
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2011

Fingerprint

Labeling
Economics
census
economics
Labels
polygon
information system
Information systems
employee
labelling
Personnel
Census
Data base

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Geography, Planning and Development
  • Management of Technology and Innovation

Cite this

@article{4699e0e9ea3246e3bb77d44c7da37c44,
title = "Establishing classification and hierarchy in populated place labeling for multiscale mapping for the National map",
abstract = "Current standards for federal mapping call for use of the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) point layer for placement of United States populated place labels. However, this point layer contains limited classification information and hierarchy information, resulting in problems of map quality for database-driven, multi-scale, reference mapping, such as maps served by The National Map Viewer from USGS. Database-driven mapping often relies simply on what labels fit best in the map frame. Our research investigates alternative sources for labeling populated places, including polygons defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, such as incorporated place, census designated place (CDP), and economic place. Within each of these polygon layers we investigate relevant attributes from the decennial and economic censuses, such as population for incorporated places and CDPs, and the number of employees for economic places. The data selected are available for the entire country to serve national mapping requirements. This combination of data allows a more refined classification of populated places on maps that better represents relative importance. Visual importance on maps through scale should derive from more than simply residential population, but also economic importance, though comparison is made to this simpler case. We differentiate a fourth category of GNIS populated place points, essentially {"}neighborhoods{"} and related features-which are not incorporated places, CDPs, nor economic places. Populated places in this fourth class do not have federally defined boundaries, necessitating an alternative method for determining hierarchy in label presentation through scale.",
author = "Butzler, {Stephen J.} and Brewer, {Cynthia Ann} and Stroh, {Wesley J.}",
year = "2011",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1559/15230406382100",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "38",
pages = "100--109",
journal = "Cartography and Geographic Information Science",
issn = "1523-0406",
publisher = "American Congress on Surveying and Mapping",
number = "2",

}

Establishing classification and hierarchy in populated place labeling for multiscale mapping for the National map. / Butzler, Stephen J.; Brewer, Cynthia Ann; Stroh, Wesley J.

In: Cartography and Geographic Information Science, Vol. 38, No. 2, 01.04.2011, p. 100-109.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Establishing classification and hierarchy in populated place labeling for multiscale mapping for the National map

AU - Butzler, Stephen J.

AU - Brewer, Cynthia Ann

AU - Stroh, Wesley J.

PY - 2011/4/1

Y1 - 2011/4/1

N2 - Current standards for federal mapping call for use of the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) point layer for placement of United States populated place labels. However, this point layer contains limited classification information and hierarchy information, resulting in problems of map quality for database-driven, multi-scale, reference mapping, such as maps served by The National Map Viewer from USGS. Database-driven mapping often relies simply on what labels fit best in the map frame. Our research investigates alternative sources for labeling populated places, including polygons defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, such as incorporated place, census designated place (CDP), and economic place. Within each of these polygon layers we investigate relevant attributes from the decennial and economic censuses, such as population for incorporated places and CDPs, and the number of employees for economic places. The data selected are available for the entire country to serve national mapping requirements. This combination of data allows a more refined classification of populated places on maps that better represents relative importance. Visual importance on maps through scale should derive from more than simply residential population, but also economic importance, though comparison is made to this simpler case. We differentiate a fourth category of GNIS populated place points, essentially "neighborhoods" and related features-which are not incorporated places, CDPs, nor economic places. Populated places in this fourth class do not have federally defined boundaries, necessitating an alternative method for determining hierarchy in label presentation through scale.

AB - Current standards for federal mapping call for use of the Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) point layer for placement of United States populated place labels. However, this point layer contains limited classification information and hierarchy information, resulting in problems of map quality for database-driven, multi-scale, reference mapping, such as maps served by The National Map Viewer from USGS. Database-driven mapping often relies simply on what labels fit best in the map frame. Our research investigates alternative sources for labeling populated places, including polygons defined by the U.S. Census Bureau, such as incorporated place, census designated place (CDP), and economic place. Within each of these polygon layers we investigate relevant attributes from the decennial and economic censuses, such as population for incorporated places and CDPs, and the number of employees for economic places. The data selected are available for the entire country to serve national mapping requirements. This combination of data allows a more refined classification of populated places on maps that better represents relative importance. Visual importance on maps through scale should derive from more than simply residential population, but also economic importance, though comparison is made to this simpler case. We differentiate a fourth category of GNIS populated place points, essentially "neighborhoods" and related features-which are not incorporated places, CDPs, nor economic places. Populated places in this fourth class do not have federally defined boundaries, necessitating an alternative method for determining hierarchy in label presentation through scale.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=80051734652&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=80051734652&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1559/15230406382100

DO - 10.1559/15230406382100

M3 - Article

VL - 38

SP - 100

EP - 109

JO - Cartography and Geographic Information Science

JF - Cartography and Geographic Information Science

SN - 1523-0406

IS - 2

ER -