Establishing conservation easements on forested riparian buffers: Opportunities for long-term streamside protection

Emilie R. Cooper, Michael Gregory Jacobson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Forest riparian buffers are an important means of conserving land. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) offers financial incentives to landowners to install forested riparian buffers under 10-15 year contracts. This study explores whether Pennsylvania CREP participants who had established a riparian buffer would also place it under a permanent conservation easement. A mail questionnaire was developed and administered to 685 CREP participants. It was found that the majority of the respondents are likely to leave their buffer intact when the CREP contract expires, but are hesitant to agree to conservation easements. Property rights, education and finances are among the key issues affecting acceptance of conservation easements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)263-274
Number of pages12
JournalSmall-scale Forestry
Volume8
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2009

Fingerprint

riparian buffers
conservation areas
property rights
economic incentives
finance
landowners
education
questionnaires
buffers
riparian forest
landowner
easement
incentive
programme

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Forestry

Cite this

@article{385112d76c8b4b24b2302fe9f35e6b55,
title = "Establishing conservation easements on forested riparian buffers: Opportunities for long-term streamside protection",
abstract = "Forest riparian buffers are an important means of conserving land. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) offers financial incentives to landowners to install forested riparian buffers under 10-15 year contracts. This study explores whether Pennsylvania CREP participants who had established a riparian buffer would also place it under a permanent conservation easement. A mail questionnaire was developed and administered to 685 CREP participants. It was found that the majority of the respondents are likely to leave their buffer intact when the CREP contract expires, but are hesitant to agree to conservation easements. Property rights, education and finances are among the key issues affecting acceptance of conservation easements.",
author = "Cooper, {Emilie R.} and Jacobson, {Michael Gregory}",
year = "2009",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/s11842-009-9082-6",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "8",
pages = "263--274",
journal = "Small-scale Forestry",
issn = "1873-7617",
publisher = "Springer Netherlands",
number = "3",

}

Establishing conservation easements on forested riparian buffers : Opportunities for long-term streamside protection. / Cooper, Emilie R.; Jacobson, Michael Gregory.

In: Small-scale Forestry, Vol. 8, No. 3, 01.09.2009, p. 263-274.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Establishing conservation easements on forested riparian buffers

T2 - Opportunities for long-term streamside protection

AU - Cooper, Emilie R.

AU - Jacobson, Michael Gregory

PY - 2009/9/1

Y1 - 2009/9/1

N2 - Forest riparian buffers are an important means of conserving land. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) offers financial incentives to landowners to install forested riparian buffers under 10-15 year contracts. This study explores whether Pennsylvania CREP participants who had established a riparian buffer would also place it under a permanent conservation easement. A mail questionnaire was developed and administered to 685 CREP participants. It was found that the majority of the respondents are likely to leave their buffer intact when the CREP contract expires, but are hesitant to agree to conservation easements. Property rights, education and finances are among the key issues affecting acceptance of conservation easements.

AB - Forest riparian buffers are an important means of conserving land. The Conservation Reserve Enhancement Program (CREP) offers financial incentives to landowners to install forested riparian buffers under 10-15 year contracts. This study explores whether Pennsylvania CREP participants who had established a riparian buffer would also place it under a permanent conservation easement. A mail questionnaire was developed and administered to 685 CREP participants. It was found that the majority of the respondents are likely to leave their buffer intact when the CREP contract expires, but are hesitant to agree to conservation easements. Property rights, education and finances are among the key issues affecting acceptance of conservation easements.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=73449131508&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=73449131508&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1007/s11842-009-9082-6

DO - 10.1007/s11842-009-9082-6

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:73449131508

VL - 8

SP - 263

EP - 274

JO - Small-scale Forestry

JF - Small-scale Forestry

SN - 1873-7617

IS - 3

ER -