Estimates of functional cerebral hemispheric differences in monolingual and bilingual people who stutter: Dual-task paradigm

Myriam Kornisch, Michael P. Robb, Richard D. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Scopus citations

Abstract

The inter-relationship of stuttering and bilingualism to functional cerebral hemispheric processing was examined on a dual-task paradigm. Eighty native German (L1) speakers, half of whom were sequential bilinguals (L2 = English), were recruited. The participants (mean age = 38.9 years) were organised into four different groups according to speech status and language ability: 20 bilinguals who stutter (BWS), 20 monolinguals who stutter (MWS), 20 bilinguals who do not stutter (BWNS), and 20 monolinguals who do not stutter (MWNS). All participants completed a dual-task paradigm involving simultaneous speaking and finger tapping. No performance differences between BWS and BWNS were found. In contrast, MWS showed greater dual-task interference compared to BWS and MWNS, as well as greater right- than left-hand disruption. A prevailing finding was that bilingualism seems to offset deficits in executive functioning associated with stuttering. Cognitive reserve may have been reflected in the present study, resulting in a bilingual advantage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)409-423
Number of pages15
JournalClinical Linguistics and Phonetics
Volume31
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 3 2017

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language
  • Speech and Hearing

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