Ethanol and the petroleum supply chain of the future: Five strategic priorities of integration

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article investigates ethanol and its integration into the petroleum supply chain. Recent state and federal mandates require varying levels of ethanol in reformulated gasoline (RFG) and, consequently, new complexities are being introduced into what has to this point been a streamlined petroleum supply chain. As managers and researchers work to respond effectively in this fast evolving situation, this explorative study employs a grounded theory approach (GTA) methodology and identifies five strategic priorities associated with achieving large-scale use of ethanol in RFG as a renewable energy source. The insights presented here regarding ethanol and its infusion into the petroleum supply chain provide a necessary first step in setting strategic priorities in this arena.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5-22
Number of pages18
JournalTransportation Journal
Volume48
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 2009

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Supply chains
Ethanol
Crude oil
Reformulated gasoline
supply
energy source
renewable energy
grounded theory
manager
Managers
methodology

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Transportation

Cite this

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Ethanol and the petroleum supply chain of the future : Five strategic priorities of integration. / Russell, Dawn M.; Ruamsook, Kusumal; Thomchick, Evelyn Ann.

In: Transportation Journal, Vol. 48, No. 1, 01.01.2009, p. 5-22.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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