Ethnobotany and conservation of tiusinte (dioon mejiae standl. & l.o. Williams, Zamiaceae) in northeastern Honduras

Mark Andrew Bonta, Oscar Flores Pinot, Daniel Graham, Jody Haynes, German Sandoval

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes the significance of the arborescent cycad "tiusinte" to Honduran culture. Dioon mejiae is a wild food that supplements maize-bean diets for an estimated 33,000 indigenous and mestizo Hondurans. Female cones are harvested for their seeds, which are processed and made into tamales, tortillas, and other products. Leaves are used for a variety of Catholic celebrations; minor uses of the leaves and female cone parts also persist. Tiusintes, a common-property resource, are being destroyed by the adverse effects of timber extraction, pastoralism, and swidden agriculture. However, traditional tiusinte protection schemes are still practiced, and these may provide the germ of a more comprehensive conservation policy for the species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)228-257
Number of pages30
JournalJournal of Ethnobiology
Volume26
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

Fingerprint

Zamiaceae
ethnobotany
seed cones
common property
Honduras
supplement
conservation
agriculture
wild foods
celebrations
food
tortillas
pastoralism
Cycadopsida
shifting cultivation
resources
dietary supplements
leaves
beans
adverse effects

All Science Journal Classification (ASJC) codes

  • Animal Science and Zoology
  • Anthropology
  • Plant Science

Cite this

Bonta, Mark Andrew ; Flores Pinot, Oscar ; Graham, Daniel ; Haynes, Jody ; Sandoval, German. / Ethnobotany and conservation of tiusinte (dioon mejiae standl. & l.o. Williams, Zamiaceae) in northeastern Honduras. In: Journal of Ethnobiology. 2006 ; Vol. 26, No. 2. pp. 228-257.
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Ethnobotany and conservation of tiusinte (dioon mejiae standl. & l.o. Williams, Zamiaceae) in northeastern Honduras. / Bonta, Mark Andrew; Flores Pinot, Oscar; Graham, Daniel; Haynes, Jody; Sandoval, German.

In: Journal of Ethnobiology, Vol. 26, No. 2, 01.09.2006, p. 228-257.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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